ICD-10 Diagnosis Code C93.30

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, not achieve remission

Diagnosis Code C93.30

ICD-10: C93.30
Short Description: Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, not achieve remission
Long Description: Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, not having achieved remission
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code C93.30


Code Classification
  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, hematopoietic and related tissue (C81-C96)
      • Monocytic leukemia (C93)

Information for Medical Professionals


Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Pediatric diagnoses Additional informationCallout TooltipPediatric diagnoses
Pediatric. Age range is 0–17 years inclusive (e.g., Reye’s syndrome, routine child health exam).


Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code C93.30 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)

  • LYMPHOMA AND LEUKEMIA WITH MAJOR O.R. PROCEDURE WITH MCC 820
  • LYMPHOMA AND LEUKEMIA WITH MAJOR O.R. PROCEDURE WITH CC 821
  • LYMPHOMA AND LEUKEMIA WITH MAJOR O.R. PROCEDURE WITHOUT CC/MCC 822

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Synonyms
  • Juvenile chronic myeloid leukemia
  • Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia
  • Myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative disease
  • Myelomonocytic leukemia
  • Myelomonocytic leukemia
  • Subacute myelomonocytic leukemia

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code C93.30 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Also called: AML, ANLL, Acute myelogenous leukemia

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there are too many of a specific type of white blood cell called a myeloblast.

AML is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. This type of cancer usually gets worse quickly if it is not treated. Possible risk factors include smoking, previous chemotherapy treatment, and exposure to radiation.

Symptoms of AML include:

  • Fever
  • Shortness of breath
  • Easy bruising or bleeding
  • Bleeding under the skin
  • Weakness or feeling tired
  • Weight loss or loss of appetite

Tests that examine the blood and bone marrow diagnose AML. Treatments include chemotherapy, other drugs, radiation therapy, stem cell transplants, and targeted therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. Once the leukemia is in remission, you need additional treatment to make sure that it does not come back.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) -- children
  • Acute myeloid leukemia
  • After chemotherapy - discharge
  • Bone marrow transplant
  • Bone marrow transplant - discharge
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)


[Read More]

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

Also called: CML, Chronic granulocytic leukemia, Chronic myelogenous leukemia

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. In chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), there are too many granulocytes, a type of white blood cell.

Most people with CML have a gene mutation (change) called the Philadelphia chromosome.

Sometimes CML does not cause any symptoms. If you have symptoms, they may include:

  • Fatigue
  • Weight loss
  • Night sweats
  • Fever
  • Pain or a feeling of fullness below the ribs on the left side

Tests that examine the blood and bone marrow diagnose CML. Treatments include chemotherapy, stem cell transplants, infusion of donated white blood cells following stem cell transplants, surgery to remove the spleen, and biologic and targeted therapies. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • After chemotherapy - discharge
  • Bone marrow transplant
  • Bone marrow transplant - discharge
  • Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)


[Read More]
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