ICD-10 Diagnosis Code C57.8

Malignant neoplasm of ovrlp sites of female genital organs

Diagnosis Code C57.8

ICD-10: C57.8
Short Description: Malignant neoplasm of ovrlp sites of female genital organs
Long Description: Malignant neoplasm of overlapping sites of female genital organs
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code C57.8

Valid for Submission
The code C57.8 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Malignant neoplasms of female genital organs (C51-C58)
      • Malignant neoplasm of other and unsp female genital organs (C57)

Information for Medical Professionals


Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Diagnoses for females only Additional informationCallout TooltipDiagnoses for females only
Diagnoses for females only.


Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code C57.8 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V34.0)

  • 736 - UTERINE AND ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR OVARIAN OR ADNEXAL MALIGNANCY WITH MCC
  • 737 - UTERINE AND ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR OVARIAN OR ADNEXAL MALIGNANCY WITH CC
  • 738 - UTERINE AND ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR OVARIAN OR ADNEXAL MALIGNANCY WITHOUT CC/MCC
  • 739 - UTERINE, ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR NON-OVARIAN AND NON-ADNEXAL MALIGNANCY WITH MCC
  • 740 - UTERINE, ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR NON-OVARIAN AND NON-ADNEXAL MALIGNANCY WITH CC
  • 741 - UTERINE, ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR NON-OVARIAN AND NON-ADNEXAL MALIGNANCY WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Synonyms
  • Overlapping malignant neoplasm of female genital organs

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code C57.8 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Table of Neoplasms

The code C57.8 is included in the table of neoplasms by anatomical site. For each site there are six possible code numbers according to whether the neoplasm in question is malignant, benign, in situ, of uncertain behavior, or of unspecified nature. The description of the neoplasm will often indicate which of the six columns is appropriate.

Where such descriptors are not present, the remainder of the Index should be consulted where guidance is given to the appropriate column for each morphological (histological) variety listed. However, the guidance in the Index can be overridden if one of the descriptors mentioned above is present.

The Tabular must be reviewed for the complete diagnosis code.

Neoplasm, neoplastic Malignant
Primary
Malignant
Secondary
CaInSitu Benign Uncertain
Behavior
Unspecified
Behavior
»genital organ or tract
  »female NEC
    »overlapping lesion
C57.8
»tubo-ovarian
C57.8C79.82D07.39D28.7D39.8D49.59
»utero-ovarian
C57.8C79.82D07.39D28.7D39.8D49.59

Information for Patients


Cervical Cancer

The cervix is the lower part of the uterus, the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The virus spreads through sexual contact. Most women's bodies are able to fight HPV infection. But sometimes the virus leads to cancer. You're at higher risk if you smoke, have had many children, use birth control pills for a long time, or have HIV infection.

Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, you may have pelvic pain or bleeding from the vagina. It usually takes several years for normal cells in the cervix to turn into cancer cells. Your health care provider can find abnormal cells by doing a Pap test to examine cells from the cervix. You may also have an HPV test. If your results are abnormal, you may need a biopsy or other tests. By getting regular screenings, you can find and treat any problems before they turn into cancer.

Treatment may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination. The choice of treatment depends on the size of the tumor, whether the cancer has spread and whether you would like to become pregnant someday.

Vaccines can protect against several types of HPV, including some that can cause cancer.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Cervical Cancer (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Cervical cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cervical cancer -- screening and prevention (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cervical dysplasia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • HPV Vaccine Gardasil®-9: What You Need to Know
  • Treatment Option Overview (Cervical Cancer) - NIH (National Cancer Institute)
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about Brachytherapy (A Type of Internal Radiation Therapy) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)


[Read More]

Ovarian Cancer

The ovaries are part of the female reproductive system. They produce a woman's eggs and female hormones. Each ovary is about the size and shape of an almond.

Cancer of the ovary is not common, but it causes more deaths than other female reproductive cancers. The sooner ovarian cancer is found and treated, the better your chance for recovery. But ovarian cancer is hard to detect early. Women with ovarian cancer may have no symptoms or just mild symptoms until the disease is in an advanced stage. Then it is hard to treat. Symptoms may include

  • A heavy feeling in the pelvis
  • Pain in the lower abdomen
  • Bleeding from the vagina
  • Weight gain or loss
  • Abnormal periods
  • Unexplained back pain that gets worse
  • Gas, nausea, vomiting, or loss of appetite

To diagnose ovarian cancer, doctors do one or more tests. They include a physical exam, a pelvic exam, lab tests, ultrasound, or a biopsy. Treatment is usually surgery followed by chemotherapy.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene testing (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • CA-125 blood test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ovarian Cancer (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Ovarian cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)


[Read More]

Uterine Cancer

Also called: Endometrial cancer

The uterus, or womb, is the place where a baby grows when a women is pregnant. There are different types of uterine cancer. The most common type starts in the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. This type is also called endometrial cancer.

The symptoms of uterine cancer include

  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge
  • Trouble urinating
  • Pelvic pain
  • Pain during intercourse

Uterine cancer usually happens after menopause. It is more common in women who are obese. You also have a higher risk if you took estrogen-only hormone replacement therapy (menopausal hormone therapy) for many years.

Tests to find uterine cancer include a pelvic exam, imaging tests, and a biopsy. The most common treatment is a hysterectomy, which is surgery to remove the uterus. Sometimes the surgery also removes the ovaries and fallopian tubes. Other treatments include hormone therapy, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. Some women get more than one type of treatment.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Choriocarcinoma (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Endometrial biopsy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Endometrial cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Uterine Cancer (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • What to Know about Brachytherapy (A Type of Internal Radiation Therapy) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)


[Read More]
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