ICD-10 Diagnosis Code C61

Malignant neoplasm of prostate

Diagnosis Code C61

ICD-10: C61
Short Description: Malignant neoplasm of prostate
Long Description: Malignant neoplasm of prostate
This is the 2019 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code C61

Valid for Submission
The code C61 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Malignant neoplasms of male genital organs (C60-C63)
      • Malignant neoplasm of prostate (C61)
Version 2019 Billable Code Diagnoses For Males Only Neoplasm Malignant Primary

Information for Medical Professionals


Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Diagnoses for males only - Diagnoses for males only.

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code C61 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V35.0)

  • 715 - OTHER MALE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM O.R. PROCEDURES FOR MALIGNANCY WITH CC/MCC
  • 716 - OTHER MALE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM O.R. PROCEDURES FOR MALIGNANCY WITHOUT CC/MCC
  • 717 - OTHER MALE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM O.R. PROCEDURES EXCEPT MALIGNANCY WITH CC/MCC
  • 718 - OTHER MALE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM O.R. PROC EXCEPT MALIGNANCY WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert to ICD-9
  • 185 - Malign neopl prostate

Synonyms
  • Adenocarcinoma of prostate
  • Carcinoma of prostate
  • Endometrioid carcinoma of prostate
  • Extraprostatic extension of tumor present
  • Extraprostatic extension of tumor present, focal
  • Extraprostatic extension of tumor present, multifocal
  • Extraprostatic extension of tumor present, non-focal
  • Extraprostatic extension of tumor present, unifocal
  • Familial prostate cancer
  • Hormone refractory prostate cancer
  • Hormone sensitive prostate cancer
  • Local recurrence of malignant tumor of prostate
  • Malignant tumor involving an organ by direct extension from prostate
  • Malignant tumor involving an organ by separate metastasis from prostate
  • Malignant tumor involving bladder by direct extension from prostate
  • Malignant tumor involving bladder by separate metastasis from prostate
  • Malignant tumor involving rectum by direct extension from prostate
  • Malignant tumor involving rectum by separate metastasis from prostate
  • Malignant tumor involving seminal vesicle by direct extension from prostate
  • Malignant tumor involving seminal vesicle by separate metastasis from prostate
  • Malignant tumor involving urethra by direct extension from prostate
  • Malignant tumor involving urethra by separate metastasis from prostate
  • Malignant tumor involving vasa deferentia by direct extension from prostate
  • Malignant tumor involving vasa deferentia by separate metastasis from prostate
  • Malignant tumor of prostate
  • Malignant tumor of seminal vesicle
  • Malignant tumor of seminal vesicle
  • Malignant tumor of spermatic cord
  • Metastasis from malignant tumor of prostate
  • Neoplasm of prostate distant metastasis staging category M0: No distant metastasis
  • Neoplasm of prostate distant metastasis staging category M1: Distant metastasis
  • Neoplasm of prostate distant metastasis staging category M1a: Metastasis to nonregional lymph node
  • Neoplasm of prostate distant metastasis staging category M1b: Metastasis to bone
  • Neoplasm of prostate distant metastasis staging category M1c: Distant metastasis with or without metastasis to bone
  • Neoplasm of prostate primary tumor staging category pT3a: Extraprostatic extension or microscopic invasion of bladder neck
  • Neoplasm of prostate primary tumor staging category pT4: Invasion of rectum, levator muscles, and/or pelvic wall
  • Neoplasm of prostate primary tumor staging category T1c: Tumor identified by needle biopsy
  • Neoplasm of prostate primary tumor staging category T2a: Involves one-half of one lobe or less
  • Neoplasm of prostate primary tumor staging category T2b: Tumor involves more than one-half of one lobe but not both lobes
  • Neoplasm of prostate primary tumor staging category T2c: Tumor involves both lobes
  • Neoplasm of prostate primary tumor staging category TX: Primary tumor cannot be assessed
  • Neoplasm of prostate regional lymph node staging category N0: No regional lymph node metastasis
  • Neoplasm of prostate regional lymph node staging category NX: regional lymph nodes not assessed
  • Neoplasm of prostate regional lymph node staging category pN1: Metastasis in regional node
  • Neoplasm of spermatic cord
  • Neoplasm of vas deferens
  • Obstructive nephropathy due to malignancy
  • Obstructive nephropathy due to prostate cancer
  • pM1a: Distant metastasis to non-regional lymph node
  • pM1b: Distant metastasis to bone
  • pM1c category
  • pM1c: Distant metastasis site other than bone or non-regional lymph node
  • Primary malignant neoplasm of prostate
  • Prostate cancer metastatic to bone
  • Prostate cancer metastatic to eye
  • pT2: Organ confined
  • pT2a: Unilateral, one-half of one lobe or less
  • pT2b: Unilateral, involving more than one-half of lobe but not both lobes
  • pT2c category
  • pT2c: Bilateral disease
  • pT3: Extraprostatic extension
  • pT3a: Extraprostatic extension
  • pT3b: Seminal vesicle invasion
  • pT4: Invasion of bladder AND/OR rectum
  • Recurrent malignant neoplasm of prostate
  • Secondary malignant neoplasm of rectum
  • Secondary malignant neoplasm of seminal vesicle
  • Secondary malignant neoplasm of spermatic cord
  • Secondary malignant neoplasm of urethra
  • Secondary malignant neoplasm of vas deferens
  • Small cell carcinoma of prostate
  • Squamous cell carcinoma of prostate
  • T1: Clinically inapparent prostate tumor not palpable or visible by imaging
  • T1a: Prostate tumor incidental histologic finding in 5% or less of tissue resected
  • T1b: Prostate tumor incidental histologic finding in > 5% of tissue resected
  • T1c: Tumor identified by needle biopsy because of elevated PSA: PROSTATE: Biopsy/TURP: PROSTATE: Resection
  • T2: Tumor confined within the prostate
  • T2a: Prostate tumor involves one lobe
  • T3: Prostate tumor extends through the prostatic capsule
  • T3a: Prostate tumor with extracapsular extension
  • T3b: Prostate tumor invades the seminal vesicle
  • Tumor invasion of perineural tissue absent
  • Tumor invasion of perineural tissue present
  • Tumor invasion of periprostatic fat absent
  • Tumor of seminal vesicle
  • Tumor of seminal vesicle

Index to Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code C61 in the Index to Diseases and Injuries:


Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code C61 in the Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries:

  • Type 1 Excludes Notes:
    • malignant neoplasm of seminal vesicle (C63.7)

Table of Neoplasms

The code C61 is included in the table of neoplasms by anatomical site. For each site there are six possible code numbers according to whether the neoplasm in question is malignant, benign, in situ, of uncertain behavior, or of unspecified nature. The description of the neoplasm will often indicate which of the six columns is appropriate.

Where such descriptors are not present, the remainder of the Index should be consulted where guidance is given to the appropriate column for each morphological (histological) variety listed. However, the guidance in the Index can be overridden if one of the descriptors mentioned above is present.

The Tabular must be reviewed for the complete diagnosis code.

Neoplasm, neoplastic Malignant
Primary
Malignant
Secondary
CaInSitu Benign Uncertain
Behavior
Unspecified
Behavior
»prostate (gland)
C61C79.82D07.5D29.1D40.0D49.59

Information for Patients


Prostate Cancer

The prostate is the gland below a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare in men younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family history, and being African-American.

Symptoms of prostate cancer may include

  • Problems passing urine, such as pain, difficulty starting or stopping the stream, or dribbling
  • Low back pain
  • Pain with ejaculation

To diagnose prostate cancer, you doctor may do a digital rectal exam to feel the prostate for lumps or anything unusual. You may also get a blood test for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). These tests are also used in prostate cancer screening, which looks for cancer before you have symptoms. If your results are abnormal, you may need more tests, such as an ultrasound, MRI, or biopsy.

Treatment often depends on the stage of the cancer. How fast the cancer grows and how different it is from surrounding tissue helps determine the stage. Men with prostate cancer have many treatment options. The treatment that's best for one man may not be best for another. The options include watchful waiting, surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy. You may have a combination of treatments.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Cryotherapy for prostate cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Digital rectal exam (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Gleason grading system (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hormone therapy for prostate cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pelvic (between the hips) radiation - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Prostate brachytherapy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Prostate cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Prostate cancer - treatment (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Prostate cancer staging (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Understanding your prostate cancer risk (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • What to Know about Brachytherapy (A Type of Internal Radiation Therapy) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)

[Read More]

Prostate cancer Prostate cancer is a common disease that affects men, usually in middle age or later. In this disorder, certain cells in the prostate become abnormal and multiply without control or order to form a tumor. The prostate is a gland that surrounds the male urethra and helps produce semen, the fluid that carries sperm.Early prostate cancer usually does not cause pain, and most affected men exhibit no noticeable symptoms. Men are often diagnosed as the result of health screenings, such as a blood test for a substance called prostate specific antigen (PSA) or a medical procedure called a digital rectal exam. As the tumor grows larger, signs and symptoms can include difficulty starting or stopping the flow of urine, a feeling of not being able to empty the bladder completely, blood in the urine or semen, or pain with ejaculation. However, these changes can also occur with many other genitourinary conditions. Having one or more of these symptoms does not necessarily mean that a man has prostate cancer.The severity and outcome of prostate cancer varies widely. Early-stage prostate cancer can usually be treated successfully, and some older men have prostate tumors that grow so slowly that they may never cause health problems during their lifetime, even without treatment. In other men, however, the cancer is much more aggressive; in these cases, prostate cancer can be life-threatening.Some cancerous tumors can invade surrounding tissue and spread to other parts of the body. Tumors that begin at one site and then spread to other areas of the body are called metastatic cancers. The signs and symptoms of metastatic cancer depend on where the disease has spread. If prostate cancer spreads, cancerous cells most often appear in the lymph nodes, bones, lungs, liver, or brain. Bone metastases of prostate cancer most often cause pain in the lower back, pelvis, or hips.A small percentage of all prostate cancers cluster in families. These hereditary cancers are associated with inherited gene mutations. Hereditary prostate cancers tend to develop earlier in life than non-inherited (sporadic) cases.
[Read More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Index of Diseases and Injuries Definitions

  • And - The word "and" should be interpreted to mean either "and" or "or" when it appears in a title.
  • Code also note - A "code also" note instructs that two codes may be required to fully describe a condition, but this note does not provide sequencing direction.
  • Code first - Certain conditions have both an underlying etiology and multiple body system manifestations due to the underlying etiology. For such conditions, the ICD-10-CM has a coding convention that requires the underlying condition be sequenced first followed by the manifestation. Wherever such a combination exists, there is a "use additional code" note at the etiology code, and a "code first" note at the manifestation code. These instructional notes indicate the proper sequencing order of the codes, etiology followed by manifestation.
  • Type 1 Excludes Notes - A type 1 Excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • Type 2 Excludes Notes - A type 2 Excludes note represents "Not included here". An excludes2 note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition represented by the code, but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When an Excludes2 note appears under a code, it is acceptable to use both the code and the excluded code together, when appropriate.
  • Includes Notes - This note appears immediately under a three character code title to further define, or give examples of, the content of the category.
  • Inclusion terms - List of terms is included under some codes. These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • NEC "Not elsewhere classifiable" - This abbreviation in the Alphabetic Index represents "other specified". When a specific code is not available for a condition, the Alphabetic Index directs the coder to the "other specified” code in the Tabular List.
  • NOS "Not otherwise specified" - This abbreviation is the equivalent of unspecified.
  • See - The "see" instruction following a main term in the Alphabetic Index indicates that another term should be referenced. It is necessary to go to the main term referenced with the "see" note to locate the correct code.
  • See Also - A "see also" instruction following a main term in the Alphabetic Index instructs that there is another main term that may also be referenced that may provide additional Alphabetic Index entries that may be useful. It is not necessary to follow the "see also" note when the original main term provides the necessary code.
  • 7th Characters - Certain ICD-10-CM categories have applicable 7th characters. The applicable 7th character is required for all codes within the category, or as the notes in the Tabular List instruct. The 7th character must always be the 7th character in the data field. If a code that requires a 7th character is not 6 characters, a placeholder X must be used to fill in the empty characters.
  • With - The word "with" should be interpreted to mean "associated with" or "due to" when it appears in a code title, the Alphabetic Index, or an instructional note in the Tabular List. The word "with" in the Alphabetic Index is sequenced immediately following the main term, not in alphabetical order.

Present on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

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