ICD-10 Diagnosis Code B05.3

Measles complicated by otitis media

Diagnosis Code B05.3

ICD-10: B05.3
Short Description: Measles complicated by otitis media
Long Description: Measles complicated by otitis media
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code B05.3

Code Classification
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases
    • Viral infections characterized by skin and mucous membrane lesions (B00-B09)
      • Measles (B05)

Information for Patients

Ear Infections

Also called: Otitis media

Ear infections are the most common reason parents bring their child to a doctor. Three out of four children will have at least one ear infection by their third birthday. Adults can also get ear infections, but they are less common.

The infection usually affects the middle ear and is called otitis media. The tubes inside the ears become clogged with fluid and mucus. This can affect hearing, because sound cannot get through all that fluid.

If your child isn't old enough to say "My ear hurts," here are a few things to look for

  • Tugging at ears
  • Crying more than usual
  • Fluid draining from the ear
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Balance difficulties
  • Hearing problems

Your health care provider will diagnose an ear infection by looking inside the ear with an instrument called an otoscope.

Often, ear infections go away on their own. Your health care provider may recommend pain relievers. Severe infections and infections in young babies may require antibiotics.

Children who get infections often may need surgery to place small tubes inside their ears. The tubes relieve pressure in the ears so that the child can hear again.

NIH: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  • Cholesteatoma
  • Ear discharge
  • Ear examination
  • Ear infection - acute
  • Ear infection - chronic
  • Ear tube insertion
  • Earache
  • Otitis media with effusion
  • Swimmer's ear

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Also called: Rubeola

Measles is an infectious disease caused by a virus. It spreads easily from person to person. It causes a blotchy red rash. The rash often starts on the head and moves down the body. Other symptoms include

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Runny nose
  • Conjunctivitis (pink eye)
  • Feeling achy and run down
  • Tiny white spots inside the mouth

Sometimes measles can lead to serious problems. There is no treatment for measles, but the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine can prevent it.

"German measles", also known as rubella, is a completely different illness.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Measles
  • Measles: Information for Parents (American Academy of Family Physicians)
  • Measles: Information for Parents (American Academy of Pediatrics)
  • Measles: Information for Parents (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • MMR (Measles, Mumps and Rubella) Vaccine: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • MMRV (Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella) Vaccine: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

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