ICD-10-CM Code H66.90

Otitis media, unspecified, unspecified ear

Version 2021 Billable Code Pediatrics

Valid for Submission

H66.90 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of otitis media, unspecified, unspecified ear. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code H66.90 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like acute otitis media, acute persistent otitis media, bacterial ear infection, chronic otitis media, chronic otitis media after insertion of tympanic ventilation tube, fungal ear infection, etc

The code is commonly used in pediatrics medical specialties to specify clinical concepts such as otitis media, unspecified.

ICD-10:H66.90
Short Description:Otitis media, unspecified, unspecified ear
Long Description:Otitis media, unspecified, unspecified ear

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code H66.90 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Acute otitis media
  • Acute persistent otitis media
  • Bacterial ear infection
  • Chronic otitis media
  • Chronic otitis media after insertion of tympanic ventilation tube
  • Fungal ear infection
  • Infection of ear
  • Infective otitis media
  • Malignant otitis media
  • Otitis
  • Otitis media
  • Otitis media caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae
  • Otitis media due to influenza
  • Otitis media due to Influenza A virus
  • Perforation of tympanic membrane due to otitis media

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code H66.90 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V38.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2021.

  • 152 - OTITIS MEDIA AND URI WITH MCC
  • 153 - OTITIS MEDIA AND URI WITHOUT MCC

Convert H66.90 to ICD-9

  • 382.9 - Otitis media NOS (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the ear and mastoid process (H60–H95)
    • Diseases of middle ear and mastoid (H65-H75)
      • Suppurative and unspecified otitis media (H66)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Ear Infections

Also called: Otitis media

Ear infections are the most common reason parents bring their child to a doctor. Three out of four children will have at least one ear infection by their third birthday. Adults can also get ear infections, but they are less common.

The infection usually affects the middle ear and is called otitis media. The tubes inside the ears become clogged with fluid and mucus. This can affect hearing, because sound cannot get through all that fluid.

If your child isn't old enough to say "My ear hurts," here are a few things to look for

  • Tugging at ears
  • Crying more than usual
  • Fluid draining from the ear
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Balance difficulties
  • Hearing problems

Your health care provider will diagnose an ear infection by looking inside the ear with an instrument called an otoscope.

Often, ear infections go away on their own. Your health care provider may recommend pain relievers. Severe infections and infections in young babies may require antibiotics.

Children who get infections often may need surgery to place small tubes inside their ears. The tubes relieve pressure in the ears so that the child can hear again.

NIH: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  • Cholesteatoma (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ear discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ear examination (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ear infection - acute (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ear infection - chronic (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ear tube insertion (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Earache (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Otitis media with effusion (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Swimmer's ear (Medical Encyclopedia)

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