ICD-10 Code T62.2X1

Toxic effect of other ingested (parts of) plant(s), accidental (unintentional)

Version 2019 Non-Billable Code Poisoning Accidental

Not Valid for Submission

T62.2X1 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of toxic effect of other ingested (parts of) plant(s), accidental (unintentional). The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10: T62.2X1
Short Description:Toxic effect of ingested (parts of) plant(s), accidental
Long Description:Toxic effect of other ingested (parts of) plant(s), accidental (unintentional)

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • T62.2X1A - Toxic effect of other ingested (parts of) plant(s), accidental (unintentional), initial encounter
  • T62.2X1D - Toxic effect of other ingested (parts of) plant(s), accidental (unintentional), subsequent encounter
  • T62.2X1S - Toxic effect of other ingested (parts of) plant(s), accidental (unintentional), sequela

Code Classification

  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Toxic effects of substances chiefly nonmedicinal as to source (T51-T65)
      • Toxic effect of other noxious substances eaten as food (T62)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (first year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA mandated code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Medical Professionals

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Accidental poisoning from foodstuffs and poisonous plants
  • Accidental poisoning from seeds
  • Anagallis arvensis poisoning
  • Brassica napus poisoning
  • Brassica oleracea poisoning
  • Brassica rapa poisoning
  • Brassica sinapis poisoning
  • Brassica species poisoning
  • Buxus sempervirens poisoning
  • Cannabis sativa poisoning
  • Cassava poisoning
  • Castor bean poisoning
  • Cotyledon species poisoning
  • Cupressus species poisoning
  • Daphne species poisoning
  • Descurainia pinnata poisoning
  • Digitalis purpurea poisoning
  • Equisetum arvense poisoning
  • Equisetum palustre poisoning
  • Equisetum species poisoning
  • Erodium species poisoning
  • Family araliaceae poisoning
  • Family brassicaceae poisoning
  • Family buxaceae poisoning
  • Family cactaceae poisoning
  • Family cannabaceae poisoning
  • Family combretaceae poisoning
  • Family crassulaceae poisoning
  • Family cupressaceae poisoning
  • Family equisetaceae poisoning
  • Family gentianaceae poisoning
  • Family geraniaceae poisoning
  • Family iridaceae poisoning
  • Family juglandaceae poisoning
  • Family juncaginaceae poisoning
  • Family lamiaceae poisoning
  • Family linaceae poisoning
  • Family loganiaceae poisoning
  • Family malvaceae poisoning
  • Family meliaceae poisoning
  • Family myoporaceae poisoning
  • Family oxalidaceae poisoning
  • Family phytolaccaceae poisoning
  • Family pinaceae poisoning
  • Family primulaceae poisoning
  • Family Sapindaceae poisoning
  • Family scrophulariaceae poisoning
  • Family taxaceae poisoning
  • Family thymelaeaceae poisoning
  • Family urticaceae poisoning
  • Gastrointestinal ricin poisoning
  • Gnidia species poisoning
  • Gossypium species poisoning
  • Greasewood poisoning
  • Hedera helix poisoning
  • Homeria pallida poisoning
  • Homeria species poisoning
  • Inhalational ricin poisoning
  • Juglans nigra poisoning
  • Kalanchoe species poisoning
  • Lathyrus species poisoning
  • Lathyrus sylvestris poisoning
  • Linum species poisoning
  • Linum usitatissium poisoning
  • Lobelia cardinalis poisoning
  • Lobelia inflata poisoning
  • Lobelia species poisoning
  • Malva species poisoning
  • Melia azedarach poisoning
  • Moraea species poisoning
  • Myoporum species poisoning
  • Opuntia species poisoning
  • Parenteral ricin poisoning
  • Perilla frutescens poisoning
  • Pimelea species poisoning
  • Pimelea trichostachya poisoning
  • Poisoning by ingestion of plant
  • Quail myopathy of Lesbos
  • Raphanus raphanistrum poisoning
  • Ricin poisoning
  • Romulea species poisoning
  • Sarcobatus vermiculatus poisoning
  • Scilla species poisoning
  • Taxus baccata poisoning
  • Taxus cuspidata poisoning
  • Taxus species poisoning
  • Terminalia oblongata poisoning
  • Toxic effect from eating berries AND/OR other plants
  • Toxic effect of food contaminant
  • Toxic myopathy
  • Tylecodon species poisoning
  • Urtica incisa poisoning

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references for the code T62.2X1 are found in the tabular index:

  • Inclusion Terms:
    • Toxic effect of other ingested (parts of) plant(s) NOS

Table of Drugs and Chemicals

The code T62.2X1 is included in the Table of Drugs and Chemicals, this table contains a classification of drugs, industrial solvents, corrosive gases, noxious plants, pesticides, and other toxic agents. Each substance in the table is assigned a code according to the poisoning classification and external causes of adverse effects. Use as many codes as necessary to describe all reported drugs, medicinal or chemical substances.

Substance Poisoning
Accidental
(unintentional)
Poisoning
Accidental
self-harm
Poisoning
Assault
Poisoning
Undetermined
Adverse
effect
Underdosing
AbrineT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Abrus (seed)T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Actaea spicataT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Actaea spicata
  »berry
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Aethusa cynapiumT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
African boxwoodT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
AmygdalineT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Anemone pulsatillaT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
BearsfootT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
BittersweetT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
BruciaT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
ButtercupsT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Calabar beanT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Caladium seguinumT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
CassavaT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
CastorT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Castor
  »bean
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Castor
  »oil
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Cerbera (odallam)T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Chelidonium majusT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Cherry laurelT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Cicuta maculata or virosaT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
CicutoxinT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Claviceps purpureaT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Clematis vitalbaT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
ColchicumT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Coniine, conineT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Conium (maculatum)T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Convallaria majalisT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Convallaria majalis
  »berry
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
CowbaneT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
CuckoopintT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Cyclamen europaeumT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
CytisusT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Cytisus
  »laburnum
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Cytisus
  »scoparius
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Daphne (gnidium) (mezereum)T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Daphne (gnidium) (mezereum)
  »berry
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
DarnelT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Deadly nightshade [See Also: Belladonna]T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Deadly nightshade [See Also: Belladonna]
  »berry
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
DelphiniumT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
ElderT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Elder
  »berry, (unripe)
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
EquisetumT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Equisetum
  »diuretic
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Fool's parsleyT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
FoxgloveT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Gaultheria procumbensT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Gelsemium (sempervirens)T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
GoldylocksT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Gratiola officinalisT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Green helleboreT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Hedge hyssopT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Hellebore (black) (green) (white)T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
HemlockT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
HenbaneT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Holly berriesT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
IlexT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
JatrophaT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Jatropha
  »curcas
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Jequirity (bean)T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Jimson weed (stramonium)T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Jimson weed (stramonium)
  »seeds
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Kosam seedT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Laburnum (seeds)T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Laburnum (seeds)
  »leaves
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
LarkspurT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Lathyrus (seed)T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Laurel, black or cherryT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Ligustrum vulgareT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Lily of the valleyT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
LobeliaT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Lolium temulentumT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Meadow saffronT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Melia azedarachT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
MezereonT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Mezereon
  »berries
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
MonkshoodT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Myristica fragransT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Nerium oleanderT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Nicotiana (plant)T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Nightshade, deadly (solanum) [See Also: Belladonna]T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Nightshade, deadly (solanum) [See Also: Belladonna]
  »berry
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
OleanderT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Physostigma venenosumT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Phytolacca decandraT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Phytolacca decandra
  »berries
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Piper cubebaT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Pokeweed (any part)T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Pride of ChinaT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Primula (veris)T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
PrivetT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Privet
  »berries
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
PrunusT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Prunus
  »laurocerasus
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Prunus
  »virginiana
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
PulsatillaT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
RanunculusT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
RicinT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Ricinus communisT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
RueT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Ruta (graveolens)T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Sabadilla (plant)T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Sabadilla (plant)
  »pesticide
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Sambucus canadensisT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Sambucus canadensis
  »berry
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Sanguinaria canadensisT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Seeds (poisonous)T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
SolanineT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Solanine
  »berries
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Solanum dulcamaraT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Solanum dulcamara
  »berries
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Spurge flaxT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
SpurgesT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
TansyT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
ThornappleT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
UrticaT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
VeratrumT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Veratrum
  »album
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Veratrum
  »alkaloids
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Veratrum
  »viride
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
WildT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Wild
  »black cherry
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Wild
  »poisonous plants NEC
T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
WisterineT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
YewT62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4
Zygadenus (venenosus)T62.2X1T62.2X2T62.2X3T62.2X4

Information for Patients


Foodborne Illness

Each year, around 48 million people in the United States get sick from contaminated food. Common causes include bacteria and viruses. Less often, the cause may be a parasite or a harmful chemical, such as a high amount of pesticides. Symptoms of foodborne illness depend on the cause. They can be mild or serious. They usually include

  • Upset stomach
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Dehydration

Most foodborne illnesses are acute. This means that they happen suddenly and last a short time.

It takes several steps to get food from the farm or fishery to your dining table. Contamination can happen during any of these steps. For example, it can happen to

  • Raw meat during slaughter
  • Fruits and vegetables when they are growing or when they are processed
  • Refrigerated foods when they are left on a loading dock in warm weather

But it can also happen in your kitchen if you leave food out for more than 2 hours at room temperature. Handling food safely can help prevent foodborne illnesses.

Most people with foodborne illness get better on their own. It is important to replace lost fluids and electrolytes to prevent dehydration. If your health care provider can diagnose the specific cause, you may get medicines such as antibiotics to treat it. For more serious illness, you may need treatment at a hospital.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


[Learn More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Index of Diseases and Injuries Definitions

  • And - The word "and" should be interpreted to mean either "and" or "or" when it appears in a title.
  • Code also note - A "code also" note instructs that two codes may be required to fully describe a condition, but this note does not provide sequencing direction.
  • Code first - Certain conditions have both an underlying etiology and multiple body system manifestations due to the underlying etiology. For such conditions, the ICD-10-CM has a coding convention that requires the underlying condition be sequenced first followed by the manifestation. Wherever such a combination exists, there is a "use additional code" note at the etiology code, and a "code first" note at the manifestation code. These instructional notes indicate the proper sequencing order of the codes, etiology followed by manifestation.
  • Type 1 Excludes Notes - A type 1 Excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • Type 2 Excludes Notes - A type 2 Excludes note represents "Not included here". An excludes2 note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition represented by the code, but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When an Excludes2 note appears under a code, it is acceptable to use both the code and the excluded code together, when appropriate.
  • Includes Notes - This note appears immediately under a three character code title to further define, or give examples of, the content of the category.
  • Inclusion terms - List of terms is included under some codes. These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • NEC "Not elsewhere classifiable" - This abbreviation in the Alphabetic Index represents "other specified". When a specific code is not available for a condition, the Alphabetic Index directs the coder to the "other specified” code in the Tabular List.
  • NOS "Not otherwise specified" - This abbreviation is the equivalent of unspecified.
  • See - The "see" instruction following a main term in the Alphabetic Index indicates that another term should be referenced. It is necessary to go to the main term referenced with the "see" note to locate the correct code.
  • See Also - A "see also" instruction following a main term in the Alphabetic Index instructs that there is another main term that may also be referenced that may provide additional Alphabetic Index entries that may be useful. It is not necessary to follow the "see also" note when the original main term provides the necessary code.
  • 7th Characters - Certain ICD-10-CM categories have applicable 7th characters. The applicable 7th character is required for all codes within the category, or as the notes in the Tabular List instruct. The 7th character must always be the 7th character in the data field. If a code that requires a 7th character is not 6 characters, a placeholder X must be used to fill in the empty characters.
  • With - The word "with" should be interpreted to mean "associated with" or "due to" when it appears in a code title, the Alphabetic Index, or an instructional note in the Tabular List. The word "with" in the Alphabetic Index is sequenced immediately following the main term, not in alphabetical order.