ICD-10 Code S45.992

Other specified injury of unspecified blood vessel at shoulder and upper arm level, left arm

Version 2019 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

S45.992 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of other specified injury of unspecified blood vessel at shoulder and upper arm level, left arm. The code is NOT valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10: S45.992
Short Description:Inj unsp blood vessel at shldr/up arm, left arm
Long Description:Other specified injury of unspecified blood vessel at shoulder and upper arm level, left arm

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • S45.992A - Other specified injury of unspecified blood vessel at shoulder and upper arm level, left arm, initial encounter
  • S45.992D - Other specified injury of unspecified blood vessel at shoulder and upper arm level, left arm, subsequent encounter
  • S45.992S - Other specified injury of unspecified blood vessel at shoulder and upper arm level, left arm, sequela

Code Classification

  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Injuries to the shoulder and upper arm (S40-S49)
      • Injury of blood vessels at shoulder and upper arm level (S45)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (first year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA mandated code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups

The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC). The diagnosis code S45.992 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V36.0 applicable from 10/01/2018 through 09/30/2019.

  • 299 - PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISORDERS WITH MCC
  • 300 - PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISORDERS WITH CC
  • 301 - PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISORDERS WITHOUT CC/MCC
  • 913 - TRAUMATIC INJURY WITH MCC
  • 914 - TRAUMATIC INJURY WITHOUT MCC
  • 949 - AFTERCARE WITH CC/MCC
  • 950 - AFTERCARE WITHOUT CC/MCC

Information for Patients


Arm Injuries and Disorders

Of the 206 bones in your body, three of them are in your arm: the humerus, radius, and ulna. Your arms are also made up of muscles, joints, tendons, and other connective tissue. Injuries to any of these parts of the arm can occur during sports, a fall, or an accident.

Types of arm injuries include

  • Tendinitis and bursitis
  • Sprains
  • Dislocations
  • Broken bones
  • Nerve problems
  • Osteoarthritis

You may also have problems or injure specific parts of your arm, such as your hand, wrist, elbow, or shoulder.

  • Arm CT scan (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Brachial plexopathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Radial head fracture - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Radial nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Shoulder Injuries and Disorders

Your shoulder joint is composed of three bones: the clavicle (collarbone), the scapula (shoulder blade), and the humerus (upper arm bone). Your shoulders are the most movable joints in your body. They can also be unstable because the ball of the upper arm is larger than the shoulder socket that holds it. To remain in a stable or normal position, the shoulder must be anchored by muscles, tendons, and ligaments.

Because your shoulder can be unstable, it can be easily injured. Common problems include

  • Sprains and strains
  • Dislocations
  • Separations
  • Tendinitis
  • Bursitis
  • Torn rotator cuffs
  • Frozen shoulder
  • Fractures
  • Arthritis

Health care providers diagnose shoulder problems by using your medical history, a physical exam, and imaging tests.

Often, the first treatment for shoulder problems is RICE. This stands for Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation. Other treatments include exercise and medicines to reduce pain and swelling. If those don't work, you may need surgery.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  • Brachial plexopathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Broken collarbone - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Frozen shoulder (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Frozen shoulder - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Shoulder arthroscopy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Shoulder CT scan (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Shoulder MRI scan (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Shoulder pain (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Using your shoulder after surgery (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Vascular Diseases

The vascular system is the body's network of blood vessels. It includes the arteries, veins and capillaries that carry blood to and from the heart. Problems of the vascular system are common and can be serious. Arteries can become thick and stiff, a problem called atherosclerosis. Blood clots can clog vessels and block blood flow to the heart or brain. Weakened blood vessels can burst, causing bleeding inside the body.

You are more likely to have vascular disease as you get older. Other factors that make vascular disease more likely include

  • Family history of vascular or heart diseases
  • Pregnancy
  • Illness or injury
  • Long periods of sitting or standing still
  • Any condition that affects the heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol
  • Smoking
  • Obesity

Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.

  • Aortic arch syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Arterial embolism (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Arteriogram (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cerebral angiography (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Duplex ultrasound (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Venous insufficiency (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Venous ulcers -- self-care (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.