ICD-10-CM Code R48.1

Agnosia

Version 2020 Billable Code No Valid Principal Dx

Valid for Submission

R48.1 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of agnosia. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code R48.1 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like agnosia, agnosia for pain, agnosia for smell, agnosia for taste, agnosia for temperature, anosodiaphoria, etc

According to ICD-10-CM guidelines this code should not to be used as a principal diagnosis code when a related definitive diagnosis has been established.

ICD-10:R48.1
Short Description:Agnosia
Long Description:Agnosia

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code R48.1:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Astereognosia (astereognosis)
  • Autotopagnosia

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • visual object agnosia R48.3

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code R48.1 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Agnosia
  • Agnosia for pain
  • Agnosia for smell
  • Agnosia for taste
  • Agnosia for temperature
  • Anosodiaphoria
  • Aphasia, agnosia, dyslexia AND/OR apraxia
  • Auditory agnosia
  • Autotopagnosia
  • Congenital auditory agnosia
  • Finger agnosia
  • Ideational agnosia
  • O/E - agnosia
  • Organic disorder of body schema
  • Organic disorder of body schema
  • Organic disorder of body schema
  • Organic disorder of body schema
  • Position agnosia
  • Sensory agnosia
  • Somatosensory agnosia
  • Tactile agnosia
  • Time agnosia

Clinical Information

  • AGNOSIA-. loss of the ability to comprehend the meaning or recognize the importance of various forms of stimulation that cannot be attributed to impairment of a primary sensory modality. tactile agnosia is characterized by an inability to perceive the shape and nature of an object by touch alone despite unimpaired sensation to light touch position and other primary sensory modalities.
  • ALEXIA PURE-. loss of the power to comprehend written materials despite preservation of the ability to write i.e. alexia without agraphia. this condition is generally attributed to lesions that "disconnect" the visual cortex of the non dominant hemisphere from language centers in the dominant hemisphere. this may occur when a dominant visual cortex injury is combined with underlying white matter lesions that involve crossing fibers from the occipital lobe of the opposite hemisphere. from adams et al. principles of neurology 6th ed p483
  • PROSOPAGNOSIA-. the inability to recognize a familiar face or to learn to recognize new faces. this visual agnosia is most often associated with lesions involving the junctional regions between the temporal and occipital lobes. the majority of cases are associated with bilateral lesions however unilateral damage to the right occipito temporal cortex has also been associated with this condition. from cortex 1995 jun;312:317 29

Convert R48.1 to ICD-9

  • 784.69 - Symbolic dysfunction NEC (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00–R99)
    • Symptoms and signs involving speech and voice (R47-R49)
      • Dyslexia and oth symbolic dysfunctions, NEC (R48)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Mental Disorders

What are mental disorders?

Mental disorders (or mental illnesses) are conditions that affect your thinking, feeling, mood, and behavior. They may be occasional or long-lasting (chronic). They can affect your ability to relate to others and function each day.

What are some types of mental disorders?

There are many different types of mental disorders. Some common ones include

  • Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and phobias
  • Depression, bipolar disorder, and other mood disorders
  • Eating disorders
  • Personality disorders
  • Psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia

What causes mental disorders?

There is no single cause for mental illness. A number of factors can contribute to risk for mental illness, such as

  • Your genes and family history
  • Your life experiences, such as stress or a history of abuse, especially if they happen in childhood
  • Biological factors such as chemical imbalances in the brain
  • A traumatic brain injury
  • A mother's exposure to viruses or toxic chemicals while pregnant
  • Use of alcohol or recreational drugs
  • Having a serious medical condition like cancer
  • Having few friends, and feeling lonely or isolated

Mental disorders are not caused by character flaws. They have nothing to do with being lazy or weak.

Who is at risk for mental disorders?

Mental disorders are common. More than half of all Americans will be diagnosed with a mental disorder at some time in their life.

How are mental disorders diagnosed?

The steps to getting a diagnosis include

  • A medical history
  • A physical exam and possibly lab tests, if your provider thinks that other medical conditions could be causing your symptoms
  • A psychological evaluation. You will answer questions about your thinking, feelings, and behaviors.

What are the treatments for mental disorders?

Treatment depends on which mental disorder you have and how serious it is. You and your provider will work on a treatment plan just for you. It usually involves some type of therapy. You may also take medicines. Some people also need social support and education on managing their condition.

In some cases, you may need more intensive treatment. You may need to go to a psychiatric hospital. This could be because your mental illness is severe. Or it could be because you are at risk of hurting yourself or someone else. In the hospital, you will get counseling, group discussions, and activities with mental health professionals and other patients.


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