ICD-10-CM Code G30

Alzheimer's disease

Version 2021 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

G30 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of alzheimer's disease. The code is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:G30
Short Description:Alzheimer's disease
Long Description:Alzheimer's disease

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • G30.0 - Alzheimer's disease with early onset
  • G30.1 - Alzheimer's disease with late onset
  • G30.8 - Other Alzheimer's disease
  • G30.9 - ... unspecified

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code G30:

Includes

Includes
This note appears immediately under a three character code title to further define, or give examples of, the content of the category.
  • Alzheimer's dementia senile and presenile forms

Use Additional Code

Use Additional Code
The “use additional code” indicates that a secondary code could be used to further specify the patient’s condition. This note is not mandatory and is only used if enough information is available to assign an additional code.
  • code to identify:
  • delirium, if applicable F05
  • dementia with behavioral disturbance F02.81
  • dementia without behavioral disturbance F02.80

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • senile degeneration of brain NEC G31.1
  • senile dementia NOS F03
  • senility NOS R41.81

Clinical Information

  • ALZHEIMER DISEASE-. a degenerative disease of the brain characterized by the insidious onset of dementia. impairment of memory judgment attention span and problem solving skills are followed by severe apraxias and a global loss of cognitive abilities. the condition primarily occurs after age 60 and is marked pathologically by severe cortical atrophy and the triad of senile plaques; neurofibrillary tangles; and neuropil threads. from adams et al. principles of neurology 6th ed pp1049 57

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the nervous system (G00–G99)
    • Other degenerative diseases of the nervous system (G30-G32)
      • Alzheimer's disease (G30)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Alzheimer's Disease

Also called: AD

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people. Dementia is a brain disorder that seriously affects a person's ability to carry out daily activities.

AD begins slowly. It first involves the parts of the brain that control thought, memory and language. People with AD may have trouble remembering things that happened recently or names of people they know. A related problem, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), causes more memory problems than normal for people of the same age. Many, but not all, people with MCI will develop AD.

In AD, over time, symptoms get worse. People may not recognize family members. They may have trouble speaking, reading or writing. They may forget how to brush their teeth or comb their hair. Later on, they may become anxious or aggressive, or wander away from home. Eventually, they need total care. This can cause great stress for family members who must care for them.

AD usually begins after age 60. The risk goes up as you get older. Your risk is also higher if a family member has had the disease.

No treatment can stop the disease. However, some drugs may help keep symptoms from getting worse for a limited time.

NIH: National Institute on Aging

  • Alzheimer disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bathing, Dressing, and Grooming: Alzheimer's Caregiving Tips - NIH (National Institute on Aging)
  • Changes in Communication Skills - NIH (National Institute on Aging)
  • Changes in Intimacy and Sexuality in Alzheimer's Disease - NIH (National Institute on Aging)
  • Coping with Agitation and Aggression - NIH (National Institute on Aging)
  • End-of-Life Care - NIH (National Institute on Aging)
  • Hallucinations, Delusions, and Paranoia - NIH (National Institute on Aging)
  • Helping Family and Friends Understand Alzheimer's Disease - NIH (National Institute on Aging)
  • Managing Medicines for a Person with Alzheimer's - NIH (National Institute on Aging)
  • Managing Personality and Behavior Changes - NIH (National Institute on Aging)
  • Mental status testing (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Urinary Incontinence in Older Adults - NIH (National Institute on Aging)

[Learn More]

Alzheimer disease Alzheimer disease is a degenerative disease of the brain that causes dementia, which is a gradual loss of memory, judgment, and ability to function. This disorder usually appears in people older than age 65, but less common forms of the disease appear earlier in adulthood.Memory loss is the most common sign of Alzheimer disease. Forgetfulness may be subtle at first, but the loss of memory worsens over time until it interferes with most aspects of daily living. Even in familiar settings, a person with Alzheimer disease may get lost or become confused. Routine tasks such as preparing meals, doing laundry, and performing other household chores can be challenging. Additionally, it may become difficult to recognize people and name objects. Affected people increasingly require help with dressing, eating, and personal care.As the disorder progresses, some people with Alzheimer disease experience personality and behavioral changes and have trouble interacting in a socially appropriate manner. Other common symptoms include agitation, restlessness, withdrawal, and loss of language skills. People with this disease usually require total care during the advanced stages of the disease.Affected individuals usually survive 8 to 10 years after the appearance of symptoms, but the course of the disease can range from 1 to 25 years. Survival is usually shorter in individuals diagnosed after age 80 than in those diagnosed at a younger age. Death usually results from pneumonia, malnutrition, or general body wasting (inanition).Alzheimer disease can be classified as early-onset or late-onset. The signs and symptoms of the early-onset form appear between a person's thirties and mid-sixties, while the late-onset form appears during or after a person's mid-sixties. The early-onset form is much less common than the late-onset form, accounting for less than 10 percent of all cases of Alzheimer disease.
[Learn More]