ICD-10-CM Code G31.0

Frontotemporal dementia

Version 2021 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

G31.0 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia. The code is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:G31.0
Short Description:Frontotemporal dementia
Long Description:Frontotemporal dementia

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • G31.01 - Pick's disease
  • G31.09 - Other frontotemporal dementia

Clinical Information

  • FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA-. the most common clinical form of frontotemporal lobar degeneration this dementia presents with personality and behavioral changes often associated with disinhibition apathy and lack of insight.

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the nervous system (G00–G99)
    • Other degenerative diseases of the nervous system (G30-G32)
      • Oth degenerative diseases of nervous system, NEC (G31)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Dementia

Also called: Senility

Dementia is the name for a group of symptoms caused by disorders that affect the brain. It is not a specific disease. People with dementia may not be able to think well enough to do normal activities, such as getting dressed or eating. They may lose their ability to solve problems or control their emotions. Their personalities may change. They may become agitated or see things that are not there.

Memory loss is a common symptom of dementia. However, memory loss by itself does not mean you have dementia. People with dementia have serious problems with two or more brain functions, such as memory and language. Although dementia is common in very elderly people, it is not part of normal aging.

Many different diseases can cause dementia, including Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Drugs are available to treat some of these diseases. While these drugs cannot cure dementia or repair brain damage, they may improve symptoms or slow down the disease.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Dementia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Dementia - behavior and sleep problems (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Dementia - daily care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Dementia - keeping safe in the home (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Dementia and driving (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Dementia due to metabolic causes (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Mental status testing (Medical Encyclopedia)

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