ICD-10-CM Code D22.12

Melanocytic nevi of left eyelid, including canthus

Version 2020 Replaced Code Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

D22.12 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of melanocytic nevi of left eyelid, including canthus. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:D22.12
Short Description:Melanocytic nevi of left eyelid, including canthus
Long Description:Melanocytic nevi of left eyelid, including canthus

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • D22.121 - Melanocytic nevi of left upper eyelid, including canthus
  • D22.122 - Melanocytic nevi of left lower eyelid, including canthus

Replaced Code

This code was replaced in the 2020 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2019. This code was replaced for the FY 2020 (October 1, 2019 - September 30, 2020).

  • D22.121 - Melanocytic nevi of left upper eyelid, including canthus
  • D22.122 - Melanocytic nevi of left lower eyelid, including canthus

Convert D22.12 to ICD-9

  • 216.1 - Benign neo skin eyelid (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Benign neoplasms, except benign neuroendocrine tumors (D10-D36)
      • Melanocytic nevi (D22)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - Code Deleted, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Birthmarks

Birthmarks are abnormalities of the skin that are present when a baby is born. There are two types of birthmarks. Vascular birthmarks are made up of blood vessels that haven't formed correctly. They are usually red. Two types of vascular birthmarks are hemangiomas and port-wine stains. Pigmented birthmarks are made of a cluster of pigment cells which cause color in skin. They can be many different colors, from tan to brown, gray to black, or even blue. Moles can be birthmarks.

No one knows what causes many types of birthmarks, but some run in families. Your baby's doctor will look at the birthmark to see if it needs any treatment or if it should be watched. Pigmented birthmarks aren't usually treated, except for moles. Treatment for vascular birthmarks includes laser surgery.

Most birthmarks are not serious, and some go away on their own. Some stay the same or get worse as you get older. Usually birthmarks are only a concern for your appearance. But certain types can increase your risk of skin cancer. If your birthmark bleeds, hurts, itches, or becomes infected, call your health care provider.


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Moles

Moles are growths on the skin. They happen when pigment cells in the skin, called melanocytes, grow in clusters. Moles are very common. Most people have between 10 and 40 moles. A person may develop new moles from time to time, usually until about age 40. In older people, they tend to fade away.

Moles are usually pink, tan or brown. They can be flat or raised. They are usually round or oval and no larger than a pencil eraser.

About one out of every ten people has at least one unusual (or atypical) mole that looks different from an ordinary mole. They are called dysplastic nevi. They may be more likely than ordinary moles to develop into melanoma, a type of skin cancer. You should have a health care professional check your moles if they look unusual, grow larger, change in color or outline, or in any other way.

NIH: National Cancer Institute


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