D18.0 - Hemangioma

Version 2023
ICD-10:D18.0
Short Description:Hemangioma
Long Description:Hemangioma
Status: Not Valid for Submission
Version:ICD-10-CM 2023
Code Classification:
  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Benign neoplasms, except benign neuroendocrine tumors (D10-D36)
      • Hemangioma and lymphangioma, any site (D18)

D18.0 is a non-specific and non-billable ICD-10 code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of hemangioma. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2023 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

Clinical Information

Specific Coding for Hemangioma

Non-specific codes like D18.0 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for hemangioma:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D18.00 for Hemangioma unspecified site
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D18.01 for Hemangioma of skin and subcutaneous tissue
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D18.02 for Hemangioma of intracranial structures
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D18.03 for Hemangioma of intra-abdominal structures
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D18.09 for Hemangioma of other sites

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with coding notes and guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to this diagnosis code:


Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.

Patient Education


Benign Tumors

Tumors are abnormal growths in your body. They can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Benign tumors grow only in one place. They cannot spread or invade other parts of your body. Even so, they can be dangerous if they press on vital organs, such as your brain.

Tumors are made up of extra cells. Normally, cells grow and divide to form new cells as your body needs them. When cells grow old, they die, and new cells take their place. Sometimes, this process goes wrong. New cells form when your body does not need them, and old cells do not die when they should. These extra cells can divide without stopping and may form tumor.

Treatment often involves surgery. Benign tumors usually don't grow back.

NIH: National Cancer Institute


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Birthmarks

Birthmarks are abnormalities of the skin that are present when a baby is born. There are two types of birthmarks. Vascular birthmarks are made up of blood vessels that haven't formed correctly. They are usually red. Two types of vascular birthmarks are hemangiomas and port-wine stains. Pigmented birthmarks are made of a cluster of pigment cells which cause color in skin. They can be many different colors, from tan to brown, gray to black, or even blue. Moles can be birthmarks.

No one knows what causes many types of birthmarks, but some run in families. Your baby's doctor will look at the birthmark to see if it needs any treatment or if it should be watched. Pigmented birthmarks aren't usually treated, except for moles. Treatment for vascular birthmarks includes laser surgery.

Most birthmarks are not serious, and some go away on their own. Some stay the same or get worse as you get older. Usually birthmarks are only a concern for your appearance. But certain types can increase your risk of skin cancer. If your birthmark bleeds, hurts, itches, or becomes infected, call your health care provider.


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Vascular Diseases

What are vascular diseases?

Your vascular system is your body's network of blood vessels. It includes your:

Vascular diseases are conditions which affect your vascular system. They are common and can be serious. Some types include:

What causes vascular diseases?

The causes of vascular diseases depend on the specific disease. These causes include:

Sometimes the cause is unknown.

Who is at risk for vascular diseases?

The risk factors for vascular diseases can vary, depending on the specific disease. But some of the more common risk factors include:

What are the symptoms of vascular diseases?

The symptoms for each disease are different.

How are vascular diseases diagnosed?

To make a diagnosis, your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask about your symptoms and medical history. You may have imaging tests and/or blood tests.

How are vascular diseases treated?

Which treatment you get depends on which vascular disease you have and how severe it is. Types of treatments for vascular diseases include:

Can vascular diseases be prevented?

There are steps you can take to help prevent vascular diseases:


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Code History