ICD-10 Diagnosis Code T63.411

Toxic effect of venom of centipede/millipede, accidental

Diagnosis Code T63.411

ICD-10: T63.411
Short Description: Toxic effect of venom of centipede/millipede, accidental
Long Description: Toxic effect of venom of centipedes and venomous millipedes, accidental (unintentional)
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code T63.411

Not Valid for Submission
The code T63.411 is a "header" and not valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Toxic effects of substances chiefly nonmedicinal as to source (T51-T65)
      • Toxic effect of contact with venomous animals and plants (T63)

Information for Medical Professionals

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The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Synonyms
  • Poisoning caused by centipede venom
  • Poisoning caused by millipede venom
  • Poisoning due to centipede and venomous millipede

Table of Drugs and Chemicals

The code T63.411 is included in the Table of Drugs and Chemicals, this table contains a classification of drugs, industrial solvents, corrosive gases, noxious plants, pesticides, and other toxic agents. Each substance in the table is assigned a code according to the poisoning classification and external causes of adverse effects. Use as many codes as necessary to describe all reported drugs, medicinal or chemical substances.

Substance Poisoning
Accidental
(unintentional)
Poisoning
Accidental
self-harm
Poisoning
Assault
Poisoning
Undetermined
Adverse
effect
Underdosing
Centipede (bite)T63.411T63.412T63.413T63.414
Millipede (tropical) (venomous)T63.411T63.412T63.413T63.414

Information for Patients


Insect Bites and Stings

Also called: Bug bites

Most insect bites are harmless, though they sometimes cause discomfort. Bee, wasp, and hornet stings and fire ant bites usually hurt. Mosquito and flea bites usually itch. Insects can also spread diseases. In the United States, some mosquitoes spread West Nile virus. Travelers outside the United States may be at risk for malaria and other infections.

To prevent insect bites and their complications

  • Don't bother insects
  • Use insect repellant
  • Wear protective clothing
  • Be careful when you eat outside because food attracts insects
  • If you know you have severe allergic reactions to insect bites and stings (such as anaphylaxis), carry an emergency epinephrine kit

  • Anaphylaxis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bee poison (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Fire ants (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Fleas (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Insect bites and stings (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Wasp sting (Medical Encyclopedia)


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