ICD-10 Diagnosis Code T58.12XD

Toxic effect of carb monx from utility gas, self-harm, subs

Diagnosis Code T58.12XD

ICD-10: T58.12XD
Short Description: Toxic effect of carb monx from utility gas, self-harm, subs
Long Description: Toxic effect of carbon monoxide from utility gas, intentional self-harm, subsequent encounter
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code T58.12XD

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes
    • Toxic effects of substances chiefly nonmedicinal as to source (T51-T65)
      • Toxic effect of carbon monoxide (T58)

Information for Medical Professionals

Information for Patients

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Also called: CO poisoning

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a gas that has no odor or color. But it is very dangerous. It can cause sudden illness and death. CO is found in combustion fumes, such as those made by cars and trucks, lanterns, stoves, gas ranges and heating systems. CO from these fumes can build up in places that don't have a good flow of fresh air. You can be poisoned by breathing them in. The most common symptoms of CO poisoning are

  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Weakness
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Chest pain
  • Confusion

It is often hard to tell if someone has CO poisoning, because the symptoms may be like those of other illnesses. People who are sleeping or intoxicated can die from CO poisoning before they have symptoms. A CO detector can warn you if you have high levels of CO in your home.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • "Invisible" Killer (Consumer Product Safety Commission)
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning
  • Hemoglobin derivatives

[Read More]


Suicide is the tenth most common cause of death in the United States. People may consider suicide when they are hopeless and can't see any other solution to their problems. Often it's related to serious depression, alcohol or substance abuse, or a major stressful event.

People who have the highest risk of suicide are white men. But women and teens report more suicide attempts. If someone talks about suicide, you should take it seriously. Urge them to get help from their doctor or the emergency room, or call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). It is available 24/7.

Therapy and medicines can help most people who have suicidal thoughts. Treating mental illnesses and substance abuse can reduce the risk of suicide.

NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration)
  • Suicide and suicidal behavior

[Read More]
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