ICD-10 Diagnosis Code S74.8X1S

Injury of nerves at hip and thigh level, right leg, sequela

Diagnosis Code S74.8X1S

ICD-10: S74.8X1S
Short Description: Injury of nerves at hip and thigh level, right leg, sequela
Long Description: Injury of other nerves at hip and thigh level, right leg, sequela
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code S74.8X1S

Valid for Submission
The code S74.8X1S is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Injuries to the hip and thigh (S70-S79)
      • Injury of nerves at hip and thigh level (S74)

Information for Patients


Hip Injuries and Disorders

Your hip is the joint where your thigh bone meets your pelvis bone. Hips are called ball-and-socket joints because the ball-like top of your thigh bone moves within a cup-like space in your pelvis. Your hips are very stable. When they are healthy, it takes great force to hurt them. However, playing sports, running, overuse or falling can all sometimes lead to hip injuries. These include

  • Strains
  • Bursitis
  • Dislocations
  • Fractures

Certain diseases also lead to hip injuries or problems. Osteoarthritis can cause pain and limited motion. Osteoporosis of the hip causes weak bones that break easily. Both of these are common in older people.

Treatment for hip disorders may include rest, medicines, physical therapy, or surgery, including hip replacement.

  • Developmental dysplasia of the hip (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Getting your home ready - knee or hip surgery (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hip arthroscopy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hip flexor strain -- aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hip fracture - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hip fracture surgeries (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hip joint injection (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hip pain (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Trochanteric bursitis (Medical Encyclopedia)


[Read More]

Leg Injuries and Disorders

Your legs are made up of bones, blood vessels, muscles, and other connective tissue. They are important for motion and standing. Playing sports, running, falling, or having an accident can damage your legs. Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint dislocations, and fractures.

These injuries can affect the entire leg, or just the foot, ankle, knee, or hip. Certain diseases also lead to leg problems. For example, knee osteoarthritis, common in older people, can cause pain and limited motion. Problems in your veins in your legs can lead to varicose veins or deep vein thrombosis.

  • Blount disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bowlegs (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Common peroneal nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Femoral nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Femur fracture repair - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Foot, leg, and ankle swelling (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Iliotibial band syndrome -- aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ischemic ulcers -- self-care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Knock knees (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Leg pain (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Shin splints - self-care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tibial nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Venous insufficiency (Medical Encyclopedia)


[Read More]

Peripheral Nerve Disorders

Also called: Neuritis, Peripheral neuritis, Peripheral neuropathy

Your peripheral nerves are the ones outside your brain and spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain and the rest of the body.

There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. Some are the result of other diseases, like diabetic nerve problems. Others, like Guillain-Barre syndrome, happen after a virus infection. Still others are from nerve compression, like carpal tunnel syndrome or thoracic outlet syndrome. In some cases, like complex regional pain syndrome and brachial plexus injuries, the problem begins after an injury. Some people are born with peripheral nerve disorders.

Symptoms often start gradually, and then get worse. They include

  • Numbness
  • Pain
  • Burning or tingling
  • Muscle weakness
  • Sensitivity to touch

Treatment aims to treat any underlying problem, reduce pain and control symptoms.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Axillary nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Common peroneal nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Distal median nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Femoral nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Glossopharyngeal neuralgia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Metabolic neuropathies (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Mononeuritis multiplex (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Neuralgia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Neuropathy secondary to drugs (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Peripheral neuropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Radial nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Sensorimotor polyneuropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tibial nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ulnar nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)


[Read More]
Previous Code
Previous Code S74.8X1D
Next Code
S74.8X2 Next Code