ICD-10 Diagnosis Code S11.024S

Puncture wound with foreign body of trachea, sequela

Diagnosis Code S11.024S

ICD-10: S11.024S
Short Description: Puncture wound with foreign body of trachea, sequela
Long Description: Puncture wound with foreign body of trachea, sequela
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code S11.024S

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes
    • Injuries to the neck (S10-S19)
      • Open wound of neck (S11)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code S11.024S is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code S11.024S is exempt from POA reporting.

Information for Patients

Neck Injuries and Disorders

Any part of your neck - muscles, bones, joints, tendons, ligaments, or nerves - can cause neck problems. Neck pain is very common. Pain may also come from your shoulder, jaw, head, or upper arms.

Muscle strain or tension often causes neck pain. The problem is usually overuse, such as from sitting at a computer for too long. Sometimes you can strain your neck muscles from sleeping in an awkward position or overdoing it during exercise. Falls or accidents, including car accidents, are another common cause of neck pain. Whiplash, a soft tissue injury to the neck, is also called neck sprain or strain.

Treatment depends on the cause, but may include applying ice, taking pain relievers, getting physical therapy or wearing a cervical collar. You rarely need surgery.

  • Cervical MRI scan
  • Cervical spine CT scan
  • Cervical spondylosis
  • Neck lump
  • Neck pain
  • Neck pain or spasms -- self care
  • Neck x-ray
  • Spinal fusion
  • Torticollis

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Tracheal Disorders

Also called: Windpipe disorders

Your trachea, or windpipe, is one part of your airway system. Airways are pipes that carry oxygen-rich air to your lungs. They also carry carbon dioxide, a waste gas, out of your lungs.

When you inhale, air travels from your nose, through your larynx, and down your windpipe. The windpipe splits into two bronchi that enter your lungs.

Problems with the trachea include narrowing, inflammation, and some inherited conditions. You may need a procedure called a tracheostomy to help you breathe if you have swallowing problems, or have conditions that affect coughing or block your airways. You might also need a tracheostomy if you are in critical care and need to be on a breathing machine.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Blockage of upper airway
  • Swallowing problems
  • Tracheitis
  • Tracheoesophageal fistula and esophageal atresia repair
  • Tracheomalacia - acquired
  • Tracheomalacia - congenital
  • Tracheostomy

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