ICD-10 Diagnosis Code J84.82

Adult pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis

Diagnosis Code J84.82

ICD-10: J84.82
Short Description: Adult pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis
Long Description: Adult pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code J84.82

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the respiratory system
    • Other respiratory diseases principally affecting the interstitium (J80-J84)
      • Other interstitial pulmonary diseases (J84)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Adult diagnoses Additional informationCallout TooltipAdult diagnoses
Adult. Age range is 15–124 years inclusive (e.g., senile delirium, mature cataract).

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code J84.82 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 516.5 - Adlt pul Langs cell hist

  • Adult pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis
  • Langerhans cell histiocytosis of lung

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code J84.82 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Interstitial Lung Diseases

Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and scarring make it hard to get enough oxygen. The scarring is called pulmonary fibrosis.

Breathing in dust or other particles in the air is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include

  • Black lung disease among coal miners, from inhaling coal dust
  • Farmer's lung, from inhaling farm dust
  • Asbestosis, from inhaling asbestos fibers
  • Siderosis, from inhaling iron from mines or welding fumes
  • Silicosis, from inhaling silica dust

Other causes include autoimmune diseases or occupational exposures to molds, gases, or fumes. Some types of interstitial lung disease have no known cause.

Treatment depends on the type of exposure and the stage of the disease. It may involve medicines, oxygen therapy, or a lung transplant in severe cases.

  • Hypersensitivity pneumonitis
  • Interstitial lung disease
  • Interstitial lung disease - adults - discharge
  • Pulmonary function tests

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Langerhans cell histiocytosis Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a disorder in which excess immune system cells called Langerhans cells build up in the body. Langerhans cells, which help regulate the immune system, are normally found throughout the body, especially in the skin, lymph nodes, spleen, lungs, liver, and bone marrow. In Langerhans cell histiocytosis, excess immature Langerhans cells usually form tumors called granulomas. However, Langerhans cell histiocytosis is not generally considered to be a form of cancer.In approximately 80 percent of affected individuals, one or more granulomas develop in the bones, causing pain and swelling. The granulomas, which usually occur in the skull or the long bones of the arms or legs, may cause the bone to fracture.Granulomas also frequently occur in the skin, appearing as blisters, reddish bumps, or rashes which can be mild to severe. The pituitary gland may also be affected; this gland is located at the base of the brain and produces hormones that control many important body functions. Without hormone supplementation, affected individuals may experience delayed or absent puberty or an inability to have children (infertility). In addition, pituitary gland damage may result in the production of excessive amounts of urine (diabetes insipidus) and dysfunction of another gland called the thyroid. Thyroid dysfunction can affect the rate of chemical reactions in the body (metabolism), body temperature, skin and hair texture, and behavior.In 15 to 20 percent of cases, Langerhans cell histiocytosis affects the lungs, liver, or blood-forming (hematopoietic) system; damage to these organs and tissues may be life-threatening. Lung involvement, which appears as swelling of the small airways (bronchioles) and blood vessels of the lungs, results in stiffening of the lung tissue, breathing problems, and increased risk of infection. Hematopoietic involvement, which occurs when the Langerhans cells crowd out blood-forming cells in the bone marrow, leads to a general reduction in the number of blood cells (pancytopenia). Pancytopenia results in fatigue due to low numbers of red blood cells (anemia), frequent infections due to low numbers of white blood cells (neutropenia), and clotting problems due to low numbers of platelets (thrombocytopenia).Other signs and symptoms that may occur in Langerhans cell histiocytosis, depending on which organs and tissues have Langerhans cell deposits, include swollen lymph nodes, abdominal pain, yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice), delayed puberty, protruding eyes, dizziness, irritability, and seizures. About 1 in 50 affected individuals experience deterioration of neurological function (neurodegeneration).Langerhans cell histiocytosis is often diagnosed in childhood, usually between ages 2 and 3, but can appear at any age. Most individuals with adult-onset Langerhans cell histiocytosis are current or past smokers; in about two-thirds of adult-onset cases the disorder affects only the lungs.The severity of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and its signs and symptoms, vary widely among affected individuals. Certain presentations or forms of the disorder were formerly considered to be separate diseases. Older names that were sometimes used for forms of Langerhans cell histiocytosis include eosinophilic granuloma, Hand-Schüller-Christian disease, and Letterer-Siwe disease.In many people with Langerhans cell histiocytosis, the disorder eventually goes away with appropriate treatment. It may even disappear on its own, especially if the disease occurs only in the skin. However, some complications of the condition, such as diabetes insipidus or other effects of tissue and organ damage, may be permanent.
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