2022 ICD-10-CM Code J84.83

Surfactant mutations of the lung

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

ICD-10:J84.83
Short Description:Surfactant mutations of the lung
Long Description:Surfactant mutations of the lung

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the respiratory system (J00–J99)
    • Other respiratory diseases principally affecting the interstitium (J80-J84)
      • Other interstitial pulmonary diseases (J84)

J84.83 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of surfactant mutations of the lung. The code J84.83 is valid during the fiscal year 2022 from October 01, 2021 through September 30, 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code J84.83 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like chronic respiratory distress with surfactant metabolism deficiency, genetic disorder of surfactant dysfunction or genetic disorder of surfactant dysfunction.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code J84.83 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Convert J84.83 to ICD-9 Code

Information for Patients


Interstitial Lung Diseases

Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and scarring make it hard to get enough oxygen. The scarring is called pulmonary fibrosis.

Breathing in dust or other particles in the air is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include

Other causes include autoimmune diseases or occupational exposures to molds, gases, or fumes. Some types of interstitial lung disease have no known cause.

Treatment depends on the type of exposure and the stage of the disease. It may involve medicines, oxygen therapy, or a lung transplant in severe cases.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Surfactant dysfunction

Surfactant dysfunction is a lung disorder that causes breathing problems. This condition results from abnormalities in the composition or function of surfactant, a mixture of certain fats (called phospholipids) and proteins that lines the lung tissue and makes breathing easy. Without normal surfactant, the tissue surrounding the air sacs in the lungs (the alveoli) sticks together (because of a force called surface tension) after exhalation, causing the alveoli to collapse. As a result, filling the lungs with air on each breath becomes very difficult, and the delivery of oxygen to the body is impaired.

The signs and symptoms of surfactant dysfunction can vary in severity. The most severe form of this condition causes respiratory distress syndrome in newborns. Affected babies have extreme difficulty breathing and are unable to get enough oxygen. The lack of oxygen can damage the baby's brain and other organs. This syndrome leads to respiratory failure, and most babies with this form of the condition do not survive more than a few months.

Less severe forms of surfactant dysfunction cause gradual onset of breathing problems in children or adults. Signs and symptoms of these milder forms are abnormally rapid breathing (tachypnea); low concentrations of oxygen in the blood (hypoxemia); and an inability to grow or gain weight at the expected rate (failure to thrive).

There are several types of surfactant dysfunction, which are identified by the genetic cause of the condition. One type, called SP-B deficiency, causes respiratory distress syndrome in newborns. Other types, known as SP-C dysfunction and ABCA3 deficiency, have signs and symptoms that range from mild to severe.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)