ICD-10 Diagnosis Code E11.649

Type 2 diabetes mellitus with hypoglycemia without coma

Diagnosis Code E11.649

ICD-10: E11.649
Short Description: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with hypoglycemia without coma
Long Description: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with hypoglycemia without coma
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code E11.649

Code Classification
  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases
    • Diabetes mellitus (E08-E13)
      • Type 2 diabetes mellitus (E11)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Hypoglycemia due to type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Hypoglycemia unawareness in type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Hypoglycemic event in diabetes
  • Hypoglycemic state in diabetes
  • Insulin reactive hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Loss of hypoglycemic warning
  • Reactive hypoglycemia

Information for Patients

Diabetes Complications

Also called: Diabetic complications

If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body functions, such as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk for heart disease and bone and joint disorders. Other long-term complications of diabetes include skin problems, digestive problems, sexual dysfunction, and problems with your teeth and gums.

Very high or very low blood sugar levels can also lead to emergencies in people with diabetes. The cause can be an underlying infection, certain medicines, or even the medicines you take to control your diabetes. If you feel nauseated, sluggish or shaky, seek emergency care.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke
  • Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke - NIH (National Diabetes Education Program)
  • Diabetes: Dental Tips - NIH (National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research)
  • Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis
  • Long term complications of diabetes

[Read More]

Diabetes Type 2

Also called: Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth.

You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. Having prediabetes also increases your risk. Prediabetes means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes.

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes appear slowly. Some people do not notice symptoms at all. The symptoms can include

  • Being very thirsty
  • Urinating often
  • Feeling very hungry or tired
  • Losing weight without trying
  • Having sores that heal slowly
  • Having blurry eyesight

Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Many people can manage their diabetes through healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing. Some people also need to take diabetes medicines.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • A1C test
  • Choose More than 50 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Diabetes Education Program)
  • Diabetes type 2 - meal planning
  • Giving an insulin injection
  • High blood sugar
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Type 2 diabetes - self-care

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Also called: Low blood sugar

Hypoglycemia means low blood glucose, or blood sugar. Your body needs glucose to have enough energy. After you eat, your blood absorbs glucose. If you eat more sugar than your body needs, your muscles, and liver store the extra. When your blood sugar begins to fall, a hormone tells your liver to release glucose.

In most people, this raises blood sugar. If it doesn't, you have hypoglycemia, and your blood sugar can be dangerously low. Signs include

  • Hunger
  • Shakiness
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Feeling anxious or weak

In people with diabetes, hypoglycemia is often a side effect of diabetes medicines. Eating or drinking something with carbohydrates can help. If it happens often, your health care provider may need to change your treatment plan.

You can also have low blood sugar without having diabetes. Causes include certain medicines or diseases, hormone or enzyme deficiencies, and tumors. Laboratory tests can help find the cause. The kind of treatment depends on why you have low blood sugar.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care
  • Drug-induced hypoglycemia
  • Insulin C-peptide
  • Low blood sugar
  • Low blood sugar - newborns

[Read More]
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