ICD-10 Diagnosis Code E11.69

Type 2 diabetes mellitus with other specified complication

Diagnosis Code E11.69

ICD-10: E11.69
Short Description: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with other specified complication
Long Description: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with other specified complication
This is the 2019 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code E11.69

Valid for Submission
The code E11.69 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Deleted Code
This code was deleted in the 2019 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2018. This code was replaced for the FY 2019 (October 1, 2018 - September 30, 2019).
  • E11.10 - Type 2 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis without coma
  • E11.11 - Type 2 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis with coma

Code Classification
  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90)
    • Diabetes mellitus (E08-E13)
      • Type 2 diabetes mellitus (E11)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-9
  • 250.80 - DMII oth nt st uncntrld (Approximate Flag)

Synonyms
  • Abnormal metabolic state in diabetes mellitus
  • Acidosis due to type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Anemia of diabetes
  • Anemia of endocrine disorder
  • Angina associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Bird-headed dwarfism with progressive ataxia, insulin-resistant diabetes, goiter, and primary gonadal insufficiency
  • Diabetes mellitus AND insipidus with optic atrophy AND deafness
  • Diabetes mellitus associated with genetic syndrome
  • Diabetic dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Diabetic hyperosmolar non-ketotic state
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis without coma
  • Diabetic mastopathy
  • Diarrhea in diabetes
  • Drug resistance to insulin
  • Dyslipidemia
  • Dyslipidemia with high density lipoprotein below reference range and triglyceride above reference range due to type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Erectile dysfunction associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Hollow visceral neuropathy
  • Hyperglycemic crisis in diabetes mellitus
  • Hyperglycemic crisis in diabetes mellitus
  • Hyperlipidemia due to type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Hyperosmolar non-ketotic state in type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Insulin resistance in diabetes
  • Ketoacidosis
  • Mixed hyperlipidemia
  • Mixed hyperlipidemia due to type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Non-infective diarrhea
  • Nutritional marasmus
  • Osteomyelitis due to type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Secondary combined hyperlipidemia
  • Secondary hyperlipidemia
  • Severe malnutrition due to type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Soft tissue complication of diabetes mellitus
  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus in obese

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code E11.69 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


    Information for Patients


    Diabetes Complications

    Also called: Diabetic complications

    If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body functions, such as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk for heart disease and bone and joint disorders. Other long-term complications of diabetes include skin problems, digestive problems, sexual dysfunction, and problems with your teeth and gums.

    Very high or very low blood sugar levels can also lead to emergencies in people with diabetes. The cause can be an underlying infection, certain medicines, or even the medicines you take to control your diabetes. If you feel nauseated, sluggish or shaky, seek emergency care.

    NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

    • Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke (Medical Encyclopedia)
    • Diabetes: Dental Tips - NIH (National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research)
    • Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
    • Diabetic ketoacidosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
    • Long term complications of diabetes (Medical Encyclopedia)

    [Read More]

    Diabetes Type 2

    Also called: Type 2 Diabetes

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth.

    You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, have obesity, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. Having prediabetes also increases your risk. Prediabetes means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. If you are at risk for type 2 diabetes, you may be able to delay or prevent developing it by making some lifestyle changes.

    The symptoms of type 2 diabetes appear slowly. Some people do not notice symptoms at all. The symptoms can include

    • Being very thirsty
    • Urinating often
    • Feeling very hungry or tired
    • Losing weight without trying
    • Having sores that heal slowly
    • Having blurry eyesight

    Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Many people can manage their diabetes through healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing. Some people also need to take diabetes medicines.

    NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

    • A1C test (Medical Encyclopedia)
    • Diabetes type 2 - meal planning (Medical Encyclopedia)
    • Giving an insulin injection (Medical Encyclopedia)
    • High blood sugar (Medical Encyclopedia)
    • Type 2 diabetes (Medical Encyclopedia)
    • Type 2 diabetes - self-care (Medical Encyclopedia)

    [Read More]

    Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a disorder characterized by abnormally high blood sugar levels. In this form of diabetes, the body stops using and making insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas that helps regulate blood sugar levels. Specifically, insulin controls how much glucose (a type of sugar) is passed from the blood into cells, where it is used as an energy source. When blood sugar levels are high (such as after a meal), the pancreas releases insulin to move the excess glucose into cells, which reduces the amount of glucose in the blood.Most people who develop type 2 diabetes first have insulin resistance, a condition in which the body's cells use insulin less efficiently than normal. As insulin resistance develops, more and more insulin is needed to keep blood sugar levels in the normal range. To keep up with the increasing need, insulin-producing cells in the pancreas (called beta cells) make larger amounts of insulin. Over time, the beta cells become less able to respond to blood sugar changes, leading to an insulin shortage that prevents the body from reducing blood sugar levels effectively. Most people have some insulin resistance as they age, but inadequate exercise and excessive weight gain make it worse, greatly increasing the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes.Type 2 diabetes can occur at any age, but it most commonly begins in middle age or later. Signs and symptoms develop slowly over years. They include frequent urination (polyuria), excessive thirst (polydipsia), fatigue, blurred vision, tingling or loss of feeling in the hands and feet (diabetic neuropathy), sores that do not heal well, and weight loss. If blood sugar levels are not controlled through medication or diet, type 2 diabetes can cause long-lasting (chronic) health problems including heart disease and stroke; nerve damage; and damage to the kidneys, eyes, and other parts of the body.
    [Read More]

    ICD-10 Footnotes

    General Equivalence Map Definitions
    The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

    • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
    • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
    • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

    Index of Diseases and Injuries Definitions

    • And - The word "and" should be interpreted to mean either "and" or "or" when it appears in a title.
    • Code also note - A "code also" note instructs that two codes may be required to fully describe a condition, but this note does not provide sequencing direction.
    • Code first - Certain conditions have both an underlying etiology and multiple body system manifestations due to the underlying etiology. For such conditions, the ICD-10-CM has a coding convention that requires the underlying condition be sequenced first followed by the manifestation. Wherever such a combination exists, there is a "use additional code" note at the etiology code, and a "code first" note at the manifestation code. These instructional notes indicate the proper sequencing order of the codes, etiology followed by manifestation.
    • Type 1 Excludes Notes - A type 1 Excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
    • Type 2 Excludes Notes - A type 2 Excludes note represents "Not included here". An excludes2 note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition represented by the code, but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When an Excludes2 note appears under a code, it is acceptable to use both the code and the excluded code together, when appropriate.
    • Includes Notes - This note appears immediately under a three character code title to further define, or give examples of, the content of the category.
    • Inclusion terms - List of terms is included under some codes. These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
    • NEC "Not elsewhere classifiable" - This abbreviation in the Alphabetic Index represents "other specified". When a specific code is not available for a condition, the Alphabetic Index directs the coder to the "other specified” code in the Tabular List.
    • NOS "Not otherwise specified" - This abbreviation is the equivalent of unspecified.
    • See - The "see" instruction following a main term in the Alphabetic Index indicates that another term should be referenced. It is necessary to go to the main term referenced with the "see" note to locate the correct code.
    • See Also - A "see also" instruction following a main term in the Alphabetic Index instructs that there is another main term that may also be referenced that may provide additional Alphabetic Index entries that may be useful. It is not necessary to follow the "see also" note when the original main term provides the necessary code.
    • 7th Characters - Certain ICD-10-CM categories have applicable 7th characters. The applicable 7th character is required for all codes within the category, or as the notes in the Tabular List instruct. The 7th character must always be the 7th character in the data field. If a code that requires a 7th character is not 6 characters, a placeholder X must be used to fill in the empty characters.
    • With - The word "with" should be interpreted to mean "associated with" or "due to" when it appears in a code title, the Alphabetic Index, or an instructional note in the Tabular List. The word "with" in the Alphabetic Index is sequenced immediately following the main term, not in alphabetical order.

    Present on Admission
    The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

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