ICD-10-CM Code E11.641

Type 2 diabetes mellitus with hypoglycemia with coma

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

E11.641 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus with hypoglycemia with coma. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code E11.641 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like hypoglycemia due to type 2 diabetes mellitus or hypoglycemic coma due to diabetes mellitus or hypoglycemic coma due to type 2 diabetes mellitus or non-ketotic non-hyperosmolar coma due to diabetes mellitus.

ICD-10:E11.641
Short Description:Type 2 diabetes mellitus with hypoglycemia with coma
Long Description:Type 2 diabetes mellitus with hypoglycemia with coma

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code E11.641 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Hypoglycemia due to type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Hypoglycemic coma due to diabetes mellitus
  • Hypoglycemic coma due to type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Non-ketotic non-hyperosmolar coma due to diabetes mellitus

Convert E11.641 to ICD-9

  • 250.30 - DMII o cm nt st uncntrld (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90)
    • Diabetes mellitus (E08-E13)
      • Type 2 diabetes mellitus (E11)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Coma

A coma is a deep state of unconsciousness. An individual in a coma is alive but unable to move or respond to his or her environment. Coma may occur as a complication of an underlying illness, or as a result of injuries, such as brain injury.

A coma rarely lasts more than 2 to 4 weeks. The outcome for coma depends on the cause, severity, and site of the damage. People may come out of a coma with physical, intellectual, and psychological problems. Some people may remain in a coma for years or even decades. For those people, the most common cause of death is infection, such as pneumonia.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • EEG (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Diabetes Complications

Also called: Diabetic complications

If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body functions, such as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk for heart disease and bone and joint disorders. Other long-term complications of diabetes include skin problems, digestive problems, sexual dysfunction, and problems with your teeth and gums.

Very high or very low blood sugar levels can also lead to emergencies in people with diabetes. The cause can be an underlying infection, certain medicines, or even the medicines you take to control your diabetes. If you feel nauseated, sluggish or shaky, seek emergency care.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Diabetes: Dental Tips - NIH (National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research)
  • Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Long term complications of diabetes (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Hypoglycemia

Also called: Low blood sugar

Hypoglycemia means low blood glucose, or blood sugar. Your body needs glucose to have enough energy. After you eat, your blood absorbs glucose. If you eat more sugar than your body needs, your muscles, and liver store the extra. When your blood sugar begins to fall, a hormone tells your liver to release glucose.

In most people, this raises blood sugar. If it doesn't, you have hypoglycemia, and your blood sugar can be dangerously low. Signs include

  • Hunger
  • Shakiness
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Feeling anxious or weak

In people with diabetes, hypoglycemia is often a side effect of diabetes medicines. Eating or drinking something with carbohydrates can help. If it happens often, your health care provider may need to change your treatment plan.

You can also have low blood sugar without having diabetes. Causes include certain medicines or diseases, hormone or enzyme deficiencies, and tumors. Laboratory tests can help find the cause. The kind of treatment depends on why you have low blood sugar.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Drug-induced hypoglycemia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Insulin C-peptide (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Low blood sugar (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Low blood sugar - newborns (Medical Encyclopedia)

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Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a disorder characterized by abnormally high blood sugar levels. In this form of diabetes, the body stops using and making insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas that helps regulate blood sugar levels. Specifically, insulin controls how much glucose (a type of sugar) is passed from the blood into cells, where it is used as an energy source. When blood sugar levels are high (such as after a meal), the pancreas releases insulin to move the excess glucose into cells, which reduces the amount of glucose in the blood.Most people who develop type 2 diabetes first have insulin resistance, a condition in which the body's cells use insulin less efficiently than normal. As insulin resistance develops, more and more insulin is needed to keep blood sugar levels in the normal range. To keep up with the increasing need, insulin-producing cells in the pancreas (called beta cells) make larger amounts of insulin. Over time, the beta cells become less able to respond to blood sugar changes, leading to an insulin shortage that prevents the body from reducing blood sugar levels effectively. Most people have some insulin resistance as they age, but inadequate exercise and excessive weight gain make it worse, greatly increasing the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes.Type 2 diabetes can occur at any age, but it most commonly begins in middle age or later. Signs and symptoms develop slowly over years. They include frequent urination (polyuria), excessive thirst (polydipsia), fatigue, blurred vision, tingling or loss of feeling in the hands and feet (diabetic neuropathy), sores that do not heal well, and weight loss. If blood sugar levels are not controlled through medication or diet, type 2 diabetes can cause long-lasting (chronic) health problems including heart disease and stroke; nerve damage; and damage to the kidneys, eyes, and other parts of the body.
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