ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D01.9

Carcinoma in situ of digestive organ, unspecified

Diagnosis Code D01.9

ICD-10: D01.9
Short Description: Carcinoma in situ of digestive organ, unspecified
Long Description: Carcinoma in situ of digestive organ, unspecified
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code D01.9

Code Classification
  • Neoplasms
    • In situ neoplasms (D00-D09)
      • Carcinoma in situ of other and unspecified digestive organs (D01)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code D01.9 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Carcinoma in situ of digestive organ
  • Carcinoma in situ of gastrointestinal tract

Information for Patients


Also called: Carcinoma, Malignancy, Neoplasms, Tumor

Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Cancer is not just one disease but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Most treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Some may involve hormone therapy, biologic therapy, or stem cell transplantation.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Cancer
  • Cancer and lymph nodes
  • Cancer prevention: take charge of your lifestyle
  • Cancer treatment -- early menopause
  • Cancer treatment: preventing infection
  • Cancer treatments
  • Hyperthermia for treating cancer
  • Laser therapy for cancer
  • Photodynamic therapy for cancer
  • Targeted therapies for cancer

[Read More]

Digestive Diseases

Also called: Gastrointestinal diseases

When you eat, your body breaks food down to a form it can use to build and nourish cells and provide energy. This process is called digestion.

Your digestive system is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube. It runs from your mouth to your anus and includes your esophagus, stomach, and small and large intestines. Your liver, gallbladder and pancreas are also involved. They produce juices to help digestion.

There are many types of digestive disorders. The symptoms vary widely depending on the problem. In general, you should see your doctor if you have

  • Blood in your stool
  • Changes in bowel habits
  • Severe abdominal pain
  • Unintentional weight loss
  • Heartburn not relieved by antacids

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Digestive diseases
  • EGD discharge
  • Fecal fat
  • Gastrointestinal fistula
  • Gastrointestinal perforation
  • Lower GI Series - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • Stools - floating
  • Upper GI and small bowel series

[Read More]
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