ICD-10-CM Code P60

Disseminated intravascular coagulation of newborn

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

P60 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of disseminated intravascular coagulation of newborn. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code P60 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like abnormal fibrinolysis, capillary thrombosis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, disseminated intravascular coagulation in newborn, fibrinolytic system finding, hereditary protein c deficiency, etc

ICD-10:P60
Short Description:Disseminated intravascular coagulation of newborn
Long Description:Disseminated intravascular coagulation of newborn

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code P60:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Defibrination syndrome of newborn

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code P60 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Abnormal fibrinolysis
  • Capillary thrombosis
  • Disseminated intravascular coagulation
  • Disseminated intravascular coagulation in newborn
  • Fibrinolytic system finding
  • Hereditary protein C deficiency
  • Homozygous protein C deficiency
  • Neonatal coagulation disorder
  • Neonatal purpura fulminans
  • Protein C deficiency disease
  • Purpura fulminans
  • Secondary non-thrombocytopenic purpura

Convert P60 to ICD-9

  • 776.2 - Dissem intravasc coag NB

Code Classification

  • Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period (P00–P96)
    • Hemorrhagic and hematological disorders of newborn (P50-P61)
      • Disseminated intravascular coagulation of newborn (P60)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Bleeding Disorders

Normally, if you get hurt, your body forms a blood clot to stop the bleeding. For blood to clot, your body needs cells called platelets and proteins known as clotting factors. If you have a bleeding disorder, you either do not have enough platelets or clotting factors or they don't work the way they should.

Bleeding disorders can be the result of other diseases, such as severe liver disease or a lack of vitamin K. They can also be inherited. Hemophilia is an inherited bleeding disorder. Bleeding disorders can also be a side effect of medicines such as blood thinners.

Various blood tests can check for a bleeding disorder. You will also have a physical exam and history. Treatments depend on the cause. They may include medicines and transfusions of blood, platelets, or clotting factor.


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Blood Clots

Normally, if you get hurt, your body forms a blood clot to stop the bleeding. After the bleeding stops and healing takes place, your body usually breaks down and removes the clot. But some people get too many clots or their blood clots abnormally. Many conditions can cause the blood to clot too much or prevent blood clots from dissolving properly.

Risk factors for excessive blood clotting include

  • Certain genetic disorders
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Diabetes
  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Overweight, obesity, and metabolic syndrome
  • Some medicines
  • Smoking
  • Staying in one position for a long time, such as being in the hospital or taking a long car or plane ride
  • Cancer and cancer treatments
Blood clots can form in, or travel to, the blood vessels in the brain, heart, kidneys, lungs, and limbs. A clot in the veins deep in the limbs is called deep vein thrombosis (DVT). DVT usually affects the deep veins of the legs. If a blood clot in a deep vein breaks off and travels through the bloodstream to the lungs and blocks blood flow, it is called a pulmonary embolism. Other complications of blood clots include stroke, heart attack, kidney problems, kidney failure, and pregnancy-related problems. Treatments for blood clots include blood thinners and other medicines.
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Uncommon Infant and Newborn Problems

It can be scary when your baby is sick, especially when it is not an everyday problem like a cold or a fever. You may not know whether the problem is serious or how to treat it. If you have concerns about your baby's health, call your health care provider right away.

Learning information about your baby's condition can help ease your worry. Do not be afraid to ask questions about your baby's care. By working together with your health care provider, you make sure that your baby gets the best care possible.


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