2022 ICD-10-CM Code I65.2

Occlusion and stenosis of carotid artery

Version 2021

Not Valid for Submission

ICD-10:I65.2
Short Description:Occlusion and stenosis of carotid artery
Long Description:Occlusion and stenosis of carotid artery

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the circulatory system (I00–I99)
    • Cerebrovascular diseases (I60-I69)
      • Occls and stenosis of precerb art, not rslt in cereb infrc (I65)

I65.2 is a non-specific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of occlusion and stenosis of carotid artery. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

Specific Coding for Occlusion and stenosis of carotid artery

Non-specific codes like I65.2 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for occlusion and stenosis of carotid artery:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use I65.21 for Occlusion and stenosis of right carotid artery
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use I65.22 for Occlusion and stenosis of left carotid artery
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use I65.23 for Occlusion and stenosis of bilateral carotid arteries
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use I65.29 for Occlusion and stenosis of unspecified carotid artery

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code I65.2 are found in the index:

Information for Patients


Carotid Artery Disease

Your carotid arteries are two large blood vessels in your neck. They supply your brain and head with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow or blocked, usually because of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is the buildup of plaque, which is made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood.

Carotid artery disease is serious because it can block the blood flow to your brain, causing a stroke. Too much plaque in the artery can cause a blockage. You can also have a blockage when a piece of plaque or a blood clot breaks off the wall of an artery. The plaque or clot can travel through the bloodstream and get stuck in one of your brain's smaller arteries.

Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms until the blockage or narrowing is severe. One sign may be a bruit (whooshing sound) that your doctor hears when listening to your artery with a stethoscope. Another sign is a transient ischemic attack (TIA), a "mini-stroke." A TIA is like a stroke, but it only lasts a few minutes, and the symptoms usually go away within an hour. Stroke is another sign.

Imaging tests can confirm whether you have carotid artery disease.

Treatments may include

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)