C62.1 - Malignant neoplasm of descended testis

Version 2023
ICD-10:C62.1
Short Description:Malignant neoplasm of descended testis
Long Description:Malignant neoplasm of descended testis
Status: Not Valid for Submission
Version:ICD-10-CM 2023
Code Classification:
  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Malignant neoplasms of male genital organs (C60-C63)
      • Malignant neoplasm of testis (C62)

C62.1 is a non-specific and non-billable ICD-10 code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of malignant neoplasm of descended testis. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2023 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

The following anatomical sites found in the Table of Neoplasms reference this diagnosis code given the correct histological behavior: Neoplasm, neoplastic testis, testes descended or Neoplasm, neoplastic testis, testes scrotal .

Specific Coding for Malignant neoplasm of descended testis

Non-specific codes like C62.1 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for malignant neoplasm of descended testis:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C62.10 for Malignant neoplasm of unspecified descended testis
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C62.11 for Malignant neoplasm of descended right testis
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C62.12 for Malignant neoplasm of descended left testis

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with coding notes and guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to this diagnosis code:


Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.

Index to Diseases and Injuries References

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for this diagnosis code are found in the injuries and diseases index:

Table of Neoplasms

This code is referenced in the table of neoplasms by anatomical site. For each site there are six possible code numbers according to whether the neoplasm in question is malignant, benign, in situ, of uncertain behavior, or of unspecified nature. The description of the neoplasm will often indicate which of the six columns is appropriate.

Where such descriptors are not present, the remainder of the Index should be consulted where guidance is given to the appropriate column for each morphological (histological) variety listed. However, the guidance in the Index can be overridden if one of the descriptors mentioned above is present.

Neoplasm, neoplastic Malignant
Primary
Malignant
Secondary
CaInSitu Benign Uncertain
Behavior
Unspecified
Behavior
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »testis, testes
    »descended
C62.1C79.82D07.69D29.2D40.1D49.59
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »testis, testes
    »scrotal
C62.1C79.82D07.69D29.2D40.1D49.59

Patient Education


Testicular Cancer

Testicles, or testes, make male hormones and sperm. They are two egg-shaped organs inside the scrotum, the loose sac of skin behind the penis. You can get cancer in one or both testicles.

Testicular cancer mainly affects young men between the ages of 20 and 39. It is also more common in men who:

Symptoms include pain, swelling, or lumps in your testicles or groin area. Doctors use a physical exam, lab tests, imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose testicular cancer. Most cases can be treated, especially if found early. Treatment options include surgery, radiation, and/or chemotherapy. Regular exams after treatment are important.

Treatments may also cause infertility. If you may want children later on, you should consider sperm banking before treatment.

NIH: National Cancer Institute


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History