2022 ICD-10-CM Code C34

Malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung

Version 2021

Not Valid for Submission

ICD-10:C34
Short Description:Malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung
Long Description:Malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung

Code Classification

  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Malignant neoplasms of respiratory and intrathoracic organs (C30-C39)
      • Malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung (C34)

C34 is a non-specific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

Specific Coding for Malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung

Non-specific codes like C34 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung:

  • NON-BILLABLE CODE - C34.0 for Malignant neoplasm of main bronchus
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C34.00 for Malignant neoplasm of unspecified main bronchus
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C34.01 for Malignant neoplasm of right main bronchus
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C34.02 for Malignant neoplasm of left main bronchus
  • NON-BILLABLE CODE - C34.1 for Malignant neoplasm of upper lobe, bronchus or lung
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C34.10 for Malignant neoplasm of upper lobe, unspecified bronchus or lung
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C34.11 for Malignant neoplasm of upper lobe, right bronchus or lung
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C34.12 for Malignant neoplasm of upper lobe, left bronchus or lung
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C34.2 for Malignant neoplasm of middle lobe, bronchus or lung
  • NON-BILLABLE CODE - C34.3 for Malignant neoplasm of lower lobe, bronchus or lung
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C34.30 for Malignant neoplasm of lower lobe, unspecified bronchus or lung
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C34.31 for Malignant neoplasm of lower lobe, right bronchus or lung
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C34.32 for Malignant neoplasm of lower lobe, left bronchus or lung
  • NON-BILLABLE CODE - C34.8 for Malignant neoplasm of overlapping sites of bronchus and lung
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C34.80 for Malignant neoplasm of overlapping sites of unspecified bronchus and lung
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C34.81 for Malignant neoplasm of overlapping sites of right bronchus and lung
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C34.82 for Malignant neoplasm of overlapping sites of left bronchus and lung
  • NON-BILLABLE CODE - C34.9 for Malignant neoplasm of unspecified part of bronchus or lung
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C34.90 for Malignant neoplasm of unspecified part of unspecified bronchus or lung
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C34.91 for Malignant neoplasm of unspecified part of right bronchus or lung
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use C34.92 for Malignant neoplasm of unspecified part of left bronchus or lung

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with coding notes and guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code C34:


Use Additional Code

Use Additional Code
The “use additional code” indicates that a secondary code could be used to further specify the patient’s condition. This note is not mandatory and is only used if enough information is available to assign an additional code.

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.

Information for Patients


Lung Cancer

What is lung cancer?

Lung cancer is cancer that forms in tissues of the lung, usually in the cells that line the air passages. It is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women.

There are two main types: small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer. These two types grow differently and are treated differently. Non-small cell lung cancer is the more common type.

Who is at risk for lung cancer?

Lung cancer can affect anyone, but there are certain factors that raise your risk of getting it:

What are the symptoms of lung cancer?

Sometimes lung cancer does not cause any signs or symptoms. It may be found during a chest x-ray done for another condition.

If you do have symptoms, they may include

How is lung cancer diagnosed?

Your health care provider may use many tools to make a diagnosis:

If you do have lung cancer, your provider will do other tests to find out how far it has spread through the lungs, lymph nodes, and the rest of the body. This is called staging. Knowing the type and stage of lung cancer you have helps your provider decide what kind of treatment you need.

What are the treatments for lung cancer?

For most patients with lung cancer, current treatments do not cure the cancer.

Your treatment will depend on which type of lung cancer you have, how far it has spread, your overall health, and other factors. You may get more than one type of treatment.

The treatments for small cell lung cancer include

The treatments for non-small cell lung cancer include

Can lung cancer be prevented?

Avoiding the risk factors may help to prevent lung cancer:

NIH: National Cancer Institute


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Lung cancer

Lung cancer is a disease in which certain cells in the lungs become abnormal and multiply uncontrollably to form a tumor. Lung cancer may not cause signs or symptoms in its early stages. Some people with lung cancer have chest pain, frequent coughing, blood in the mucus, breathing problems, trouble swallowing or speaking, loss of appetite and weight loss, fatigue, or swelling in the face or neck. Additional symptoms can develop if the cancer spreads (metastasizes) into other tissues. Lung cancer occurs most often in adults in their sixties or seventies. Most people who develop lung cancer have a history of long-term tobacco smoking; however, the condition can occur in people who have never smoked.

Lung cancer is generally divided into two types, small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer, based on the size of the affected cells when viewed under a microscope. Non-small cell lung cancer accounts for 85 percent of lung cancer, while small cell lung cancer accounts for the remaining 15 percent.

Small cell lung cancer grows quickly and in more than half of cases the cancer has spread beyond the lung by the time the condition is diagnosed. Small cell lung cancer often metastasizes, most commonly to the liver, brain, bones, and adrenal glands (small hormone-producing glands located on top of each kidney). After diagnosis, most people with small cell lung cancer survive for about 1 year; less than seven percent survive 5 years.

Non-small cell lung cancer is divided into three main subtypes: adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and large cell lung carcinoma. Adenocarcinoma arises from the cells that line the small air sacs (alveoli) located throughout the lungs. Squamous cell carcinoma arises from squamous cells that line the passages leading from the windpipe (trachea) to the lungs (bronchi). Large cell carcinoma arises from epithelial cells that line the lungs. Large cell carcinoma encompasses non-small cell lung cancers that do not appear to be adenocarcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas. The 5-year survival rate for people with non-small cell lung cancer is usually between 11 and 17 percent; it can be lower or higher depending on the subtype and stage of the cancer.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Summary Learn about non-small cell lung cancer risk factors, symptoms, tests to diagnose, factors affecting prognosis, staging, and treatment.
[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)