C34.80 - Malignant neoplasm of overlapping sites of unspecified bronchus and lung

Version 2023
ICD-10:C34.80
Short Description:Malignant neoplasm of ovrlp sites of unsp bronchus and lung
Long Description:Malignant neoplasm of overlapping sites of unspecified bronchus and lung
Status: Valid for Submission
Version:ICD-10-CM 2023
Code Classification:
  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Malignant neoplasms of respiratory and intrathoracic organs (C30-C39)
      • Malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung (C34)

C34.80 is a billable ICD-10 code used to specify a medical diagnosis of malignant neoplasm of overlapping sites of unspecified bronchus and lung. The code is valid during the fiscal year 2023 from October 01, 2022 through September 30, 2023 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The following anatomical sites found in the Table of Neoplasms reference the parent code C34.8 of the current diagnosis code given the correct histological behavior: Neoplasm, neoplastic bronchus overlapping lesion or Neoplasm, neoplastic lung overlapping lesion or Neoplasm, neoplastic trachea (cartilage) (mucosa) overlapping lesion with bronchus or lung or Neoplasm, neoplastic tracheobronchial or Neoplasm, neoplastic tracheobronchial overlapping lesion with lung .

Unspecified diagnosis codes like C34.80 are acceptable when clinical information is unknown or not available about a particular condition. Although a more specific code is preferable, unspecified codes should be used when such codes most accurately reflect what is known about a patient's condition. Specific diagnosis codes should not be used if not supported by the patient's medical record.

The code is linked to some Quality Measures as part of Medicare's Quality Payment Program (QPP). When this code is used as part of a patient's medical record the following Quality Measures might apply: Lung Cancer Reporting (biopsy/cytology Specimens) , Lung Cancer Reporting (resection Specimens).

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Convert to ICD-9 Code

Source ICD-10 CodeTarget ICD-9 Code
C34.80162.8 - Mal neo bronch/lung NEC
Approximate Flag - The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 and ICD-9 codes and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Quality Payment Program Measures

When code C34.80 is part of the patient's diagnoses the following Quality Measures apply and affect reimbursement. The objective of Medicare's Quality Measures is to improve patient care by making it more: effective, safe, efficient, patient-centered and equitable.

Quality Measure Description Quality Domain Measure Type High Priority Submission Methods
Lung Cancer Reporting (Biopsy/Cytology Specimens)Pathology reports based on biopsy and/or cytology specimens with a diagnosis of primary non-small cell lung cancer classified into specific histologic type or classified as non-small cell lung cancer not otherwise specified (NSCLC-NOS) with an explanation included in the pathology report.Communication and Care CoordinationProcessYESClaims, Registry
Lung Cancer Reporting (Resection Specimens)Pathology reports based on resection specimens with a diagnosis of primary lung carcinoma that include the pT category, pN category and for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), histologic type.Communication and Care CoordinationProcessYESClaims, Registry

Table of Neoplasms

The parent code C34.8 of the current diagnosis code is referenced in the table of neoplasms by anatomical site. For each site there are six possible code numbers according to whether the neoplasm in question is malignant, benign, in situ, of uncertain behavior, or of unspecified nature. The description of the neoplasm will often indicate which of the six columns is appropriate.

Where such descriptors are not present, the remainder of the Index should be consulted where guidance is given to the appropriate column for each morphological (histological) variety listed. However, the guidance in the Index can be overridden if one of the descriptors mentioned above is present.

Neoplasm, neoplastic Malignant
Primary
Malignant
Secondary
CaInSitu Benign Uncertain
Behavior
Unspecified
Behavior
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »bronchus
    »overlapping lesion
C34.8
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »lung
    »overlapping lesion
C34.8
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »trachea (cartilage) (mucosa)
    »overlapping lesion with bronchus or lung
C34.8
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »tracheobronchial
C34.8C78.39D02.1D14.2D38.1D49.1
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »tracheobronchial
    »overlapping lesion with lung
C34.8

Patient Education


Lung Cancer

What is lung cancer?

Lung cancer is cancer that forms in tissues of the lung, usually in the cells that line the air passages. It is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women.

There are two main types: small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer. These two types grow differently and are treated differently. Non-small cell lung cancer is the more common type.

Who is at risk for lung cancer?

Lung cancer can affect anyone, but there are certain factors that raise your risk of getting it:

What are the symptoms of lung cancer?

Sometimes lung cancer does not cause any signs or symptoms. It may be found during a chest x-ray done for another condition.

If you do have symptoms, they may include:

How is lung cancer diagnosed?

Your health care provider may use many tools to make a diagnosis:

If you do have lung cancer, your provider will do other tests to find out how far it has spread through the lungs, lymph nodes, and the rest of the body. This is called staging. Knowing the type and stage of lung cancer you have helps your provider decide what kind of treatment you need.

What are the treatments for lung cancer?

For most patients with lung cancer, current treatments do not cure the cancer.

Your treatment will depend on which type of lung cancer you have, how far it has spread, your overall health, and other factors. You may get more than one type of treatment.

The treatments for small cell lung cancer include:

The treatments for non-small cell lung cancer include:

Can lung cancer be prevented?

Avoiding the risk factors may help to prevent lung cancer:

NIH: National Cancer Institute


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Lung Cancer-Patient Version

Learn about lung cancer risk factors, symptoms, tests to diagnose, factors affecting prognosis, staging, and treatment.
[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Summary

Learn about non-small cell lung cancer risk factors, symptoms, tests to diagnose, factors affecting prognosis, staging, and treatment.
[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History