ICD-10-CM Code B54

Unspecified malaria

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

B54 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of unspecified malaria. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code B54 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like airport malaria, anemia due to infection, asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus infection, clinical infection, clinical malaria, disease due to plasmodiidae, etc

ICD-10:B54
Short Description:Unspecified malaria
Long Description:Unspecified malaria

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code B54 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Airport malaria
  • Anemia due to infection
  • Asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus infection
  • Clinical infection
  • Clinical malaria
  • Disease due to Plasmodiidae
  • Hemolytic anemia due to infection
  • Hemolytic anemia due to malaria
  • Human immunodeficiency virus World Health Organization 2007 stage 1 co-occurrent with malaria
  • Human immunodeficiency virus World Health Organization 2007 stage 2 co-occurrent with malaria
  • Human immunodeficiency virus World Health Organization 2007 stage 3 co-occurrent with malaria
  • Human immunodeficiency virus World Health Organization 2007 stage 4 co-occurrent with malaria
  • Hyperimmune malarious splenomegaly
  • Induced malaria
  • Intermittent fever
  • Malaria
  • Malaria in mother complicating childbirth
  • Malarial fever
  • Malarial hepatitis
  • Maternal malaria during pregnancy - baby delivered
  • Maternal malaria during pregnancy - baby not yet delivered
  • Maternal malaria during pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium
  • Maternal malaria during pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium
  • Maternal malaria during pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium
  • Maternal malaria during pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium
  • Maternal malaria during pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium
  • Maternal malaria during pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium
  • Maternal malaria in the puerperium - baby delivered during current episode of care
  • Maternal malaria in the puerperium - baby delivered during previous episode of care
  • Mixed malaria
  • Nephrotic syndrome in malaria
  • Parasitic disease in mother complicating pregnancy, childbirth AND/OR puerperium
  • Parasitic disease in mother complicating pregnancy, childbirth AND/OR puerperium
  • Parasitic disease in mother complicating pregnancy, childbirth AND/OR puerperium
  • Parasitic disease in mother complicating pregnancy, childbirth AND/OR puerperium
  • Parasitic disease in mother complicating pregnancy, childbirth AND/OR puerperium
  • Parasitic disease in mother complicating pregnancy, childbirth AND/OR puerperium
  • Protozoal disease complicating pregnancy childbirth and the puerperium
  • Protozoal disease complicating pregnancy childbirth and the puerperium
  • Protozoal disease complicating pregnancy childbirth and the puerperium
  • Protozoal disease complicating pregnancy childbirth and the puerperium
  • Protozoal disease complicating pregnancy childbirth and the puerperium
  • Protozoal disease complicating pregnancy childbirth and the puerperium
  • Therapeutically induced malaria
  • World Health Organization 2007 Human immunodeficiency virus infection clinical stage 1
  • World Health Organization 2007 Human immunodeficiency virus infection clinical stage 2
  • World Health Organization 2007 Human immunodeficiency virus infection clinical stage 3
  • World Health Organization 2007 Human immunodeficiency virus infection clinical stage 4

Clinical Information

  • BLACKWATER FEVER-. a complication of malaria falciparum characterized by the passage of dark red to black urine.
  • MALARIA-. a protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the plasmodium genus: plasmodium falciparum; plasmodium vivax; plasmodium ovale; and plasmodium malariae; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus anopheles. malaria is endemic in parts of asia africa central and south america oceania and certain caribbean islands. it is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high fever; sweating; shaking chills; and anemia. malaria in animals is caused by other species of plasmodia.
  • MALARIA AVIAN-. any of a group of infections of fowl caused by protozoa of the genera plasmodium leucocytozoon and haemoproteus. the life cycles of these parasites and the disease produced bears strong resemblance to those observed in human malaria.
  • MALARIA FALCIPARUM-. malaria caused by plasmodium falciparum. this is the severest form of malaria and is associated with the highest levels of parasites in the blood. this disease is characterized by irregularly recurring febrile paroxysms that in extreme cases occur with acute cerebral renal or gastrointestinal manifestations.
  • MALARIA CEREBRAL-. a condition characterized by somnolence or coma in the presence of an acute infection with plasmodium falciparum and rarely other plasmodium species. initial clinical manifestations include headaches; seizures; and alterations of mentation followed by a rapid progression to coma. pathologic features include cerebral capillaries filled with parasitized erythrocytes and multiple small foci of cortical and subcortical necrosis. from adams et al. principles of neurology 6th ed p136
  • MALARIA VIVAX-. malaria caused by plasmodium vivax. this form of malaria is less severe than malaria falciparum but there is a higher probability for relapses to occur. febrile paroxysms often occur every other day.
  • MALARIA VACCINES-. vaccines made from antigens arising from any of the four strains of plasmodium which cause malaria in humans or from p. berghei which causes malaria in rodents.

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code B54 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2020.

  • 867 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITH MCC
  • 868 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITH CC
  • 869 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert B54 to ICD-9

Code Classification

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Protozoal diseases (B50-B64)
      • Unspecified malaria (B54)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Malaria

Malaria is a serious disease caused by a parasite. You get it when an infected mosquito bites you. Malaria is a major cause of death worldwide, but it is almost wiped out in the United States. The disease is mostly a problem in developing countries with warm climates. If you travel to these countries, you are at risk. There are four different types of malaria caused by four related parasites. The most deadly type occurs in Africa south of the Sahara Desert.

Malaria symptoms include chills, flu-like symptoms, fever, vomiting, diarrhea, and jaundice. A blood test can diagnose it. It can be life-threatening. However, you can treat malaria with drugs. The type of drug depends on which kind of malaria you have and where you were infected.

Malaria can be prevented. When traveling to areas where malaria is found

  • See your doctor for medicines that protect you
  • Wear insect repellent with DEET
  • Cover up
  • Sleep under mosquito netting

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


[Learn More]