ICD-10 Code B37.5

Candidal meningitis

Version 2019 Billable Code
ICD-10: B37.5
Short Description:Candidal meningitis
Long Description:Candidal meningitis

Valid for Submission

ICD-10 B37.5 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of candidal meningitis. The code is valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert B37.5 to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms:

  • Candidal meningitis

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code B37.5 are found in the index:


Information for Patients


Meningitis

Also called: Spinal meningitis

Meningitis is inflammation of the thin tissue that surrounds the brain and spinal cord, called the meninges. There are several types of meningitis. The most common is viral meningitis. You get it when a virus enters the body through the nose or mouth and travels to the brain. Bacterial meningitis is rare, but can be deadly. It usually starts with bacteria that cause a cold-like infection. It can cause stroke, hearing loss, and brain damage. It can also harm other organs. Pneumococcal infections and meningococcal infections are the most common causes of bacterial meningitis.

Anyone can get meningitis, but it is more common in people with weak immune systems. Meningitis can get serious very quickly. You should get medical care right away if you have

  • A sudden high fever
  • A severe headache
  • A stiff neck
  • Nausea or vomiting

Early treatment can help prevent serious problems, including death. Tests to diagnose meningitis include blood tests, imaging tests, and a spinal tap to test cerebrospinal fluid. Antibiotics can treat bacterial meningitis. Antiviral medicines may help some types of viral meningitis. Other medicines can help treat symptoms.

There are vaccines to prevent some of the bacterial infections that cause meningitis.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cerebrospinal fluid culture (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meningitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meningitis - cryptococcal (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meningitis - gram-negative (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meningitis - H. influenzae (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meningococcal ACWY Vaccines - MenACWY and MPSV4: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13): What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine: What You Need to Know (Immunization Action Coalition)
  • Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

[Learn More]

Yeast Infections

Also called: Candidiasis, Moniliasis

Candida is the scientific name for yeast. It is a fungus that lives almost everywhere, including in your body. Usually, your immune system keeps yeast under control. If you are sick or taking antibiotics, it can multiply and cause an infection.

Yeast infections affect different parts of the body in different ways:

  • Thrush is a yeast infection that causes white patches in your mouth
  • Candida esophagitis is thrush that spreads to your esophagus, the tube that takes food from your mouth to your stomach. It can make it hard or painful to swallow.
  • Women can get vaginal yeast infections, causing vaginitis
  • Yeast infections of the skin cause itching and rashes
  • Yeast infections in your bloodstream can be life-threatening

Antifungal medicines get rid of yeast infections in most people. If you have a weak immune system, treatment might be more difficult.

  • Candida infection of the skin (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Thrush (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Vaginal yeast infection (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.