Dermatophytosis (B35)

Clinical Information for Dermatophytosis (B35)

Tinea Pedis - Dermatological pruritic lesion in the feet, caused by Trichophyton rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, or Epidermophyton floccosum.

Tinea cruris - Fungal infection of the groin. The main causative fungus is TRICHOPHYTON.

Onycholysis - Separation of nail plate from the underlying nail bed. It can be a sign of skin disease, infection (such as ONYCHOMYCOSIS) or tissue injury.

Tinea Capitis - Ringworm of the scalp and associated hair mainly caused by species of MICROSPORUM; TRICHOPHYTON; and EPIDERMOPHYTON, which may occasionally involve the eyebrows and eyelashes.

Tinea Favosa - A disease of the scalp that may affect the glabrous skin and the nails and is recognized by the concave sulfur-yellow crusts that form around loose, wiry hairs. Atrophy ensues, leaving a smooth, glossy, thin, paper-white patch. This type of disease is rare in the United States and more frequently seen in the Middle East, Africa, Southeastern Europe, and other countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. (Arnold, Odom, and James, Andrew's Diseases of the Skin, 8th ed, p319)

Onychomycosis - A fungal infection of the nail, usually caused by DERMATOPHYTES; YEASTS; or nondermatophyte MOLDS.

Trichophyton - A mitosporic fungal genus and an anamorphic form of Arthroderma. Various species attack the skin, nails, and hair.

Instructional Notations

Includes Includes
This note appears immediately under a three character code title to further define, or give examples of, the content of the category.

  • favus
  • infections due to species of Epidermophyton, Micro-sporum and Trichophyton
  • tinea, any type except those in B36