2022 ICD-10-CM Code B16

Acute hepatitis B

Version 2021

Not Valid for Submission

ICD-10:B16
Short Description:Acute hepatitis B
Long Description:Acute hepatitis B

Code Classification

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Viral hepatitis (B15-B19)
      • Acute hepatitis B (B16)

B16 is a non-specific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of acute hepatitis b. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

Specific Coding for Acute hepatitis B

Non-specific codes like B16 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for acute hepatitis b:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use B16.0 for Acute hepatitis B with delta-agent with hepatic coma
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use B16.1 for Acute hepatitis B with delta-agent without hepatic coma
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use B16.2 for Acute hepatitis B without delta-agent with hepatic coma
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use B16.9 for Acute hepatitis B without delta-agent and without hepatic coma

Information for Patients


Hepatitis B

What is hepatitis?

Hepatitis is inflammation of the liver. Inflammation is swelling that happens when tissues of the body are injured or infected. It can damage your liver. This swelling and damage can affect how well your liver functions.

What is hepatitis B?

Hepatitis B is a type of viral hepatitis. It can cause an acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term) infection. People with an acute infection usually get better on their own without treatment. Some people with chronic hepatitis B will need treatment.

Thanks to a vaccine, hepatitis B is not very common in the United States. It is more common in certain parts of the world, such as sub-Saharan Africa and parts of Asia.

What causes hepatitis B?

Hepatitis B is caused by the hepatitis B virus. The virus spreads through contact with blood, semen, or other body fluids from a person who has the virus.

Who is at risk for hepatitis B?

Anyone can get hepatitis B, but the risk is higher in

What are the symptoms of hepatitis B?

Often, people with hepatitis B don't have symptoms. Adults and children over 5 are more likely to have symptoms than younger children.

Some people with acute hepatitis B have symptoms 2 to 5 months after infection. These symptoms can include

If you have chronic hepatitis B, you may not have symptoms until complications develop. This could be decades after you were infected. For this reason, hepatitis B screening is important, even if you have no symptoms. Screening means that you are tested for a disease even though you don't have symptoms. If you are at high risk, your health care provider may suggest screening.

What other problems can hepatitis B cause?

In rare cases, acute hepatitis B can cause liver failure.

Chronic hepatitis B can develop into a serious disease that causes long-term health problems such as cirrhosis (scarring of the liver), liver cancer, and liver failure.

If you have ever had hepatitis B, the virus may become active again, or reactivated, later in life. This could start to damage the liver and cause symptoms.

How is hepatitis B diagnosed?

To diagnose hepatitis B, your health care provider may use many tools to make a diagnosis:

What are the treatments for hepatitis B?

If you have acute hepatitis B, you probably don't need treatment. Some people with chronic hepatitis B don't need treatment. But if you have a chronic infection and blood tests show that hepatitis B could be damaging your liver, you may need to take antiviral medicines.

Can hepatitis B be prevented?

The best way to prevent hepatitis B is to get the hepatitis B vaccine.

You can also reduce your chance of hepatitis B infection by

If you think you have been in contact with the hepatitis B virus, see your health care provider right away. Your provider may give you a dose of the hepatitis B vaccine to prevent infection. In some cases, your provider may also give you a medicine called hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG). You need to get the vaccine and the HBIG (if needed) as soon as possible after coming into contact with the virus. It is best if you can get them within 24 hours.

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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)