2021 ICD-10-CM Code B17.1

Acute hepatitis C

Version 2021

Not Valid for Submission

B17.1 is a non-specific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of acute hepatitis c. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

ICD-10:B17.1
Short Description:Acute hepatitis C
Long Description:Acute hepatitis C

Code Classification

Specific Coding for Acute hepatitis C

Non-specific codes like B17.1 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for acute hepatitis c:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use B17.10 for Acute hepatitis C without hepatic coma
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use B17.11 for Acute hepatitis C with hepatic coma

Information for Patients


Hepatitis C

Also called: HCV

Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with infected blood. Hepatitis C can also spread through sex with person who has it and from mother to baby during childbirth.

Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If you do get symptoms, you may feel as if you have the flu. You may also have jaundice, a yellowing of skin and eyes, dark-colored urine, and pale bowel movements. Without treatment, hepatitis C may lead to cirrhosis (scarring and damage in the liver), liver failure, and liver cancer. Early diagnosis and treatment of hepatitis C can prevent these complications. A blood test can tell if you have it.

The treatment for hepatitis C is antiviral medicines.They can cure the disease in most cases.There is no vaccine for hepatitis C.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)