ICD-10-CM Code B15.9

Hepatitis A without hepatic coma

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

B15.9 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of hepatitis a without hepatic coma. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code B15.9 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like acute fulminating type a viral hepatitis, acute fulminating viral hepatitis, acute type a viral hepatitis, anicteric type a viral hepatitis, anicteric viral hepatitis, finding of hepatitis a status, etc

ICD-10:B15.9
Short Description:Hepatitis A without hepatic coma
Long Description:Hepatitis A without hepatic coma

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code B15.9:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Hepatitis A (acute)(viral) NOS

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code B15.9 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Acute fulminating type A viral hepatitis
  • Acute fulminating viral hepatitis
  • Acute type A viral hepatitis
  • Anicteric type A viral hepatitis
  • Anicteric viral hepatitis
  • Finding of Hepatitis A status
  • Hepatitis A - current infection
  • Relapsing type A viral hepatitis
  • Relapsing viral hepatitis
  • Viral hepatitis A without hepatic coma
  • Viral hepatitis A without hepatic coma, without hepatitis delta
  • Viral hepatitis, type A

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code B15.9 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V38.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2021.

  • 441 - DISORDERS OF LIVER EXCEPT MALIGNANCY, CIRRHOSIS OR ALCOHOLIC HEPATITIS WITH MCC
  • 442 - DISORDERS OF LIVER EXCEPT MALIGNANCY, CIRRHOSIS OR ALCOHOLIC HEPATITIS WITH CC
  • 443 - DISORDERS OF LIVER EXCEPT MALIGNANCY, CIRRHOSIS OR ALCOHOLIC HEPATITIS WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert B15.9 to ICD-9

  • 070.1 - Hepatitis A w/o coma

Code Classification

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Viral hepatitis (B15-B19)
      • Acute hepatitis A (B15)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Hepatitis A

Also called: HAV

Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with an infected person's stool. You can get it from

  • Eating food made by an infected person who did not wash their hands after using the bathroom
  • Drinking untreated water or eating food washed in untreated water
  • Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with an infected person's stool
  • Having close contact with an infected person, such as through sex or caring for someone who is ill

Most people do not have any symptoms. If you do have symptoms, you may feel as if you have the flu. You may also have yellowish eyes and skin, called jaundice. A blood test will show if you have HAV.

HAV usually gets better in a few weeks without treatment. However, some people can have symptoms for up to 6 months. Your doctor may suggest medicines to help relieve your symptoms.

The hepatitis A vaccine can prevent HAV. Good hygiene can also help. Wash your hands thoroughly before preparing food, after using the toilet, or after changing a diaper. International travelers should be careful about drinking tap water.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Hepatitis A (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hepatitis A -- children (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hepatitis A and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent It (American Academy of Family Physicians)
  • Hepatitis A and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent It (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Hepatitis A and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent It (American Academy of Pediatrics)
  • Hepatitis A Vaccine: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Hepatitis virus panel (Medical Encyclopedia)

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