A80.3 - Acute paralytic poliomyelitis, other and unspecified

Version 2023
ICD-10:A80.3
Short Description:Acute paralytic poliomyelitis, other and unspecified
Long Description:Acute paralytic poliomyelitis, other and unspecified
Status: Not Valid for Submission
Version:ICD-10-CM 2023
Code Classification:
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Viral and prion infections of the central nervous system (A80-A89)
      • Acute poliomyelitis (A80)

A80.3 is a non-specific and non-billable ICD-10 code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of acute paralytic poliomyelitis, other and unspecified. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2023 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

Unspecified diagnosis codes like A80.3 are acceptable when clinical information is unknown or not available about a particular condition. Although a more specific code is preferable, unspecified codes should be used when such codes most accurately reflect what is known about a patient's condition. Specific diagnosis codes should not be used if not supported by the patient's medical record.

Specific Coding for Acute paralytic poliomyelitis, other and unspecified

Non-specific codes like A80.3 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for acute paralytic poliomyelitis, other and unspecified:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use A80.30 for Acute paralytic poliomyelitis, unspecified
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use A80.39 for Other acute paralytic poliomyelitis

Patient Education


Polio and Post-Polio Syndrome

What is polio?

Polio, or poliomyelitis, is a disease that spreads from person to person. It is caused by the poliovirus. The virus attacks the nervous system. In serious cases, it can cause paralysis (where you can't move parts of the body). The paralysis may be lifelong and can sometimes be life-threatening.

Because of vaccines, polio is rare in the United States. But polio does occur in some parts of the world, and travelers can spread the virus.

How does polio spread?

The poliovirus is very contagious. It spreads through contact with:

This contact can happen if:

People who have the infection can spread it to others just before and up to several weeks after the symptoms appear. People who don't have symptoms can still spread the virus to others and make them sick.

Who is more likely to develop polio?

Polio mainly affects children under age 5. But people of any age (including adults) who are unvaccinated are at risk of developing polio. People who live in or travel to areas where there is polio are more likely to get polio.

What are the symptoms of polio?

Most people who get infected with poliovirus do not have any symptoms. But one out of four people who get polio will have flu-like symptoms. These symptoms usually last 2 to 5 days, and they include:

In rare cases, polio can be very serious. It can lead to:

What is post-polio syndrome (PPS)?

Post-polio syndrome (PPS) is a condition that affects polio survivors many years after they recovered from polio. It usually happens 15-40 years later. It is not contagious.

People who get PPS start having new weakening in muscles that were previously affected by the polio infection. Symptoms may range from mild to serious. The symptoms of PPS include:

PPS is rarely life-threatening, but the symptoms can interfere with your daily life.

How is polio diagnosed?

If you think you or someone in your family has symptoms of polio, call your healthcare provider right away or go to an emergency room.

To find out if you or your child has polio, the provider:

What are the treatments for polio and post-polio syndrome (PPS)?

There is no cure or specific treatment for polio. For a mild case, getting rest and drinking plenty of liquids may help with some of the symptoms.

If the polio is more serious, you or your child may need:

There is no cure for PPS. Treatments may help you manage your symptoms. They include:

Can polio be prevented?

There are two types of vaccine that can prevent polio:

Children in the United States get four doses of PV as part of their routine childhood immunizations. Most adults in the United States were vaccinated against polio as children.

There is a one-time IPV booster. It may be given to adults who have completed their polio vaccinations but are at higher risk of contact with poliovirus. You may be at higher risk if you are:

Another way to help prevent the spread of polio is to wash your hands often with soap and water. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers will not kill poliovirus.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History