A56 - Other sexually transmitted chlamydial diseases

Version 2023
ICD-10:A56
Short Description:Other sexually transmitted chlamydial diseases
Long Description:Other sexually transmitted chlamydial diseases
Status: Not Valid for Submission
Version:ICD-10-CM 2023
Code Classification:
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Infections with a predominantly sexual mode of transmission (A50-A64)
      • Other sexually transmitted chlamydial diseases (A56)

A56 is a non-specific and non-billable ICD-10 code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of other sexually transmitted chlamydial diseases. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2023 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

Specific Coding for Other sexually transmitted chlamydial diseases

Non-specific codes like A56 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for other sexually transmitted chlamydial diseases:

  • NON-BILLABLE CODE - A56.0 for Chlamydial infection of lower genitourinary tract
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use A56.00 for Chlamydial infection of lower genitourinary tract, unspecified
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use A56.01 for Chlamydial cystitis and urethritis
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use A56.02 for Chlamydial vulvovaginitis
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use A56.09 for Other chlamydial infection of lower genitourinary tract
  • NON-BILLABLE CODE - A56.1 for Chlamydial infection of pelviperitoneum and other genitourinary organs
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use A56.11 for Chlamydial female pelvic inflammatory disease
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use A56.19 for Other chlamydial genitourinary infection
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use A56.2 for Chlamydial infection of genitourinary tract, unspecified
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use A56.3 for Chlamydial infection of anus and rectum
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use A56.4 for Chlamydial infection of pharynx
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use A56.8 for Sexually transmitted chlamydial infection of other sites

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with coding notes and guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to this diagnosis code:


Includes

Includes
This note appears immediately under a three character code title to further define, or give examples of, the content of the category.

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.

Type 2 Excludes

Type 2 Excludes
A type 2 excludes note represents "Not included here". An excludes2 note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition represented by the code, but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When an Excludes2 note appears under a code, it is acceptable to use both the code and the excluded code together, when appropriate.

Patient Education


Chlamydia Infections

What is chlamydia?

Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted disease. It is caused by bacteria called Chlamydia trachomatis. It can infect both men and women. Women can get chlamydia in the cervix, rectum, or throat. Men can get chlamydia in the urethra (inside the penis), rectum, or throat.

How do you get chlamydia?

You can get chlamydia during oral, vaginal, or anal sex with someone who has the infection. A woman can also pass chlamydia to her baby during childbirth.

If you've had chlamydia and were treated in the past, you can get re-infected if you have unprotected sex with someone who has it.

Who is at risk of getting chlamydia?

Chlamydia is more common in young people, especially young women. You are more likely to get it if you don't consistently use a condom, or if you have multiple partners.

What are the symptoms of chlamydia?

Chlamydia doesn't usually cause any symptoms. So you may not realize that you have it. People with chlamydia who have no symptoms can still pass the disease to others. If you do have symptoms, they may not appear until several weeks after you have sex with an infected partner.

Symptoms in women include:

If the infection spreads, you might get lower abdominal pain, pain during sex, nausea, or fever.

Symptoms in men include:

If the chlamydia infects the rectum (in men or women), it can cause rectal pain, discharge, and/or bleeding.

How is chlamydia diagnosed?

There are lab tests to diagnose chlamydia. Your health care provider may ask you to provide a urine sample. For women, providers sometimes use (or ask you to use) a cotton swab to get a sample from your vagina to test for chlamydia.

Who should be tested for chlamydia?

You should go to your health provider for a test if you have symptoms of chlamydia, or if you have a partner who has a sexually transmitted disease. Pregnant women should get a test when they go to their first prenatal visit.

People at higher risk should get checked for chlamydia every year:

What other problems can chlamydia cause?

In women, an untreated infection can spread to your uterus and fallopian tubes, causing pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). PID can cause permanent damage to your reproductive system. This can lead to long-term pelvic pain, infertility, and ectopic pregnancy. Women who have had chlamydia infections more than once are at higher risk of serious reproductive health complications.

Men often don't have health problems from chlamydia. Sometimes it can infect the epididymis (the tube that carries sperm). This can cause pain, fever, and, rarely, infertility.

Both men and women can develop reactive arthritis because of a chlamydia infection. Reactive arthritis is a type of arthritis that happens as a "reaction" to an infection in the body.

Babies born to infected mothers can get eye infections and pneumonia from chlamydia. It may also make it more likely for your baby to be born too early.

Untreated chlamydia may also increase your chances of getting or giving HIV/AIDS.

What are the treatments for chlamydia?

Antibiotics will cure the infection. You may get a one-time dose of the antibiotics, or you may need to take medicine every day for 7 days. Antibiotics cannot repair any permanent damage that the disease has caused.

To prevent spreading the disease to your partner, you should not have sex until the infection has cleared up. If you got a one-time dose of antibiotics, you should wait 7 days after taking the medicine to have sex again. If you have to take medicine every day for 7 days, you should not have sex again until you have finished taking all of the doses of your medicine.

It is common to get a repeat infection, so you should get tested again about three months after treatment.

Can chlamydia be prevented?

The only sure way to prevent chlamydia is to not have vaginal, anal, or oral sex.

Correct usage of latex condoms greatly reduces, but does not eliminate, the risk of catching or spreading chlamydia. If your or your partner is allergic to latex, you can use polyurethane condoms.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


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Code History