ICD-10 Code A54.6

Gonococcal infection of anus and rectum

Version 2019 Billable Code
ICD-10: A54.6
Short Description:Gonococcal infection of anus and rectum
Long Description:Gonococcal infection of anus and rectum

Valid for Submission

ICD-10 A54.6 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of gonococcal infection of anus and rectum. The code is valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Infections with a predominantly sexual mode of transmission (A50-A64)
      • Gonococcal infection (A54)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups

The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC). The diagnosis code A54.6 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V36.0 applicable from 10/01/2018 through 09/30/2019.

  • 393 - OTHER DIGESTIVE SYSTEM DIAGNOSES WITH MCC
  • 394 - OTHER DIGESTIVE SYSTEM DIAGNOSES WITH CC
  • 395 - OTHER DIGESTIVE SYSTEM DIAGNOSES WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert A54.6 to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • 098.7 - Gc infect anus & rectum

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms:

  • Gonococcal anal infection
  • Gonorrhea of rectum

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code A54.6 are found in the index:


Information for Patients


Anal Disorders

Also called: Anorectal diseases

The anus is the opening of the rectum through which stool passes out of your body. Problems with the anus are common. They include hemorrhoids, abscesses, fissures (cracks), and cancer.

You may be embarrassed to talk about your anal troubles. But it is important to let your doctor know, especially if you have pain or bleeding. The more details you can give about your problem, the better your doctor will be able to help you. Treatments vary depending on the particular problem.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Anal fissure (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Anal itching -- self-care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Anorectal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Anoscopy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Digital rectal exam (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Imperforate anus (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lower GI Series - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • Perianal streptococcal cellulitis (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Gonorrhea

Also called: The clap

Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted disease. It is most common in young adults. The bacteria that cause gonorrhea can infect the genital tract, mouth, or anus. You can get gonorrhea during vaginal, oral, or anal sex with an infected partner. A pregnant woman can pass it to her baby during childbirth.

Gonorrhea does not always cause symptoms. In men, gonorrhea can cause pain when urinating and discharge from the penis. If untreated, it can cause problems with the prostate and testicles.

In women, the early symptoms of gonorrhea often are mild. Later, it can cause bleeding between periods, pain when urinating, and increased discharge from the vagina. If untreated, it can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, which causes problems with pregnancy and infertility.

Your health care provider will diagnose gonorrhea with lab tests. Treatment is with antibiotics. Treating gonorrhea is becoming more difficult because drug-resistant strains are increasing. Correct usage of latex condoms greatly reduces, but does not eliminate, the risk of catching or spreading gonorrhea. The most reliable way to avoid infection is to not have anal, vaginal, or oral sex.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Condom Fact Sheet in Brief (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Endocervical gram stain (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Gonococcal arthritis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Gonorrhea (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Rectal culture (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Urethral discharge culture (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Rectal Disorders

The rectum is the lower part of your large intestine where your body stores stool. Problems with rectum are common. They include hemorrhoids, abscesses, incontinence and cancer.

Many people are embarrassed to talk about rectal troubles. But seeing your doctor about problems in this area is important. This is especially true if you have pain or bleeding. Treatments vary depending on the particular problem.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Anorectal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Digital rectal exam (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lower GI Series - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • Proctitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Rectal biopsy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Rectal prolapse (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Rectal prolapse repair (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.