ICD-10 Diagnosis Code B58.2

Toxoplasma meningoencephalitis

Diagnosis Code B58.2

ICD-10: B58.2
Short Description: Toxoplasma meningoencephalitis
Long Description: Toxoplasma meningoencephalitis
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code B58.2

Valid for Submission
The code B58.2 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Protozoal diseases (B50-B64)
      • Toxoplasmosis (B58)

Information for Medical Professionals

Information for Patients


Encephalitis

Encephalitis is an inflammation of the brain. Usually the cause is a viral infection, but bacteria can also cause it. It can be mild or severe. Most cases are mild. You may have flu-like symptoms. With a mild case, you may just need rest, plenty of fluids, and a pain reliever.

Severe cases need immediate treatment. Symptoms of severe cases include

  • Severe headache
  • Sudden fever
  • Drowsiness
  • Vomiting
  • Confusion
  • Seizures

In babies, additional symptoms may include constant crying, poor feeding, body stiffness, and bulging in the soft spots of the skull.

Severe cases may require a stay in the hospital. Treatments include oral and intravenous (IV) medicines to reduce inflammation and treat infection. Patients with breathing difficulties may need artificial respiration. Some people may need physical, speech, and occupational therapy once the illness is under control.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • CSF analysis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Encephalitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Meningitis

Also called: Spinal meningitis

Meningitis is inflammation of the thin tissue that surrounds the brain and spinal cord, called the meninges. There are several types of meningitis. The most common is viral meningitis. You get it when a virus enters the body through the nose or mouth and travels to the brain. Bacterial meningitis is rare, but can be deadly. It usually starts with bacteria that cause a cold-like infection. It can cause stroke, hearing loss, and brain damage. It can also harm other organs. Pneumococcal infections and meningococcal infections are the most common causes of bacterial meningitis.

Anyone can get meningitis, but it is more common in people with weak immune systems. Meningitis can get serious very quickly. You should get medical care right away if you have

  • A sudden high fever
  • A severe headache
  • A stiff neck
  • Nausea or vomiting

Early treatment can help prevent serious problems, including death. Tests to diagnose meningitis include blood tests, imaging tests, and a spinal tap to test cerebrospinal fluid. Antibiotics can treat bacterial meningitis. Antiviral medicines may help some types of viral meningitis. Other medicines can help treat symptoms.

There are vaccines to prevent some of the bacterial infections that cause meningitis.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cerebrospinal fluid culture (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meningitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meningitis - cryptococcal (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meningitis - gram-negative (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meningitis - H. influenzae (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meningococcal ACWY Vaccines - MenACWY and MPSV4: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13): What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine: What You Need to Know (Immunization Action Coalition)
  • Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)


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Toxoplasmosis

Toxoplasmosis is a disease caused by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. More than 60 million people in the U.S. have the parasite. Most of them don't get sick. But the parasite causes serious problems for some people. These include people with weak immune systems and babies whose mothers become infected for the first time during pregnancy. Problems can include damage to the brain, eyes, and other organs.

You can get toxoplasmosis from

  • Waste from an infected cat
  • Eating contaminated meat that is raw or not well cooked
  • Using utensils or cutting boards after they've had contact with contaminated raw meat
  • Drinking infected water
  • Receiving an infected organ transplant or blood transfusion

Most people with toxoplasmosis don't need treatment. There are drugs to treat it for pregnant women and people with weak immune systems.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Congenital toxoplasmosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Toxoplasma test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Toxoplasmosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Toxoplasmosis: An Important Message for Cat Owners (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Toxoplasmosis: An Important Message for Women (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)


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