ICD-10-CM Code B58.83

Toxoplasma tubulo-interstitial nephropathy

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

B58.83 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of toxoplasma tubulo-interstitial nephropathy. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code B58.83 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like renal coccidiosis or toxoplasma tubulointerstitial nephropathy.

ICD-10:B58.83
Short Description:Toxoplasma tubulo-interstitial nephropathy
Long Description:Toxoplasma tubulo-interstitial nephropathy

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code B58.83:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Toxoplasma pyelonephritis

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code B58.83 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Renal coccidiosis
  • Toxoplasma tubulointerstitial nephropathy

Convert B58.83 to ICD-9

  • 130.7 - Toxoplasmosis site NEC (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Protozoal diseases (B50-B64)
      • Toxoplasmosis (B58)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Kidney Diseases

Also called: Renal disease

You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. They are near the middle of your back, just below the rib cage. Inside each kidney there are about a million tiny structures called nephrons. They filter your blood. They remove wastes and extra water, which become urine. The urine flows through tubes called ureters. It goes to your bladder, which stores the urine until you go to the bathroom.

Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove wastes. Causes can include genetic problems, injuries, or medicines. You have a higher risk of kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or a close family member with kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease damages the nephrons slowly over several years. Other kidney problems include

  • Cancer
  • Cysts
  • Stones
  • Infections

Your doctor can do blood and urine tests to check if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail, you will need dialysis or a kidney transplant.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

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  • Congenital nephrotic syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
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  • Interstitial nephritis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Kidney removal (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Kidney removal - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Membranoproliferative GN I (Medical Encyclopedia)
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  • Minimal change disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Nephrocalcinosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
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  • Obstructive uropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Perirenal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Proximal renal tubular acidosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Reflux nephropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Renal papillary necrosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Renal vein thrombosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Unilateral hydronephrosis (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Toxoplasmosis

Toxoplasmosis is a disease caused by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. More than 60 million people in the U.S. have the parasite. Most of them don't get sick. But the parasite causes serious problems for some people. These include people with weak immune systems and babies whose mothers become infected for the first time during pregnancy. Problems can include damage to the brain, eyes, and other organs.

You can get toxoplasmosis from

  • Waste from an infected cat
  • Eating contaminated meat that is raw or not well cooked
  • Using utensils or cutting boards after they've had contact with contaminated raw meat
  • Drinking infected water
  • Receiving an infected organ transplant or blood transfusion

Most people with toxoplasmosis don't need treatment. There are drugs to treat it for pregnant women and people with weak immune systems.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Congenital toxoplasmosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Toxoplasma test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Toxoplasmosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Toxoplasmosis: An Important Message for Cat Owners (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Toxoplasmosis: An Important Message for Women (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

[Learn More]