ICD-10 Code B57.42

Meningoencephalitis in Chagas' disease

Version 2019 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

B57.42 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of meningoencephalitis in chagas' disease. The code is valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10: B57.42
Short Description:Meningoencephalitis in Chagas' disease
Long Description:Meningoencephalitis in Chagas' disease

Code Classification

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Protozoal diseases (B50-B64)
      • Chagas' disease (B57)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (first year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA mandated code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups

The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC). The diagnosis code B57.42 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V36.0 applicable from 10/01/2018 through 09/30/2019.

  • 867 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITH MCC
  • 868 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITH CC
  • 869 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert B57.42 to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • 086.1 - Chagas dis of oth organ (Approximate Flag)

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Meningitis due to Chagas disease
  • Meningoencephalitis due to Chagas disease

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code B57.42 are found in the index:


Information for Patients


Chagas Disease

Also called: American trypanosomiasis, South American trypanosomiasis

Chagas disease is caused by a parasite. It is common in Latin America but not in the United States. Infected blood-sucking bugs, sometimes called kissing bugs, spread it. When the bug bites you, usually on your face, it leaves behind infected waste. You can get the infection if you rub it in your eyes or nose, the bite wound or a cut. The disease can also spread through contaminated food, a blood transfusion, a donated organ or from mother to baby during pregnancy.

If you notice symptoms, they might include

  • Fever
  • Flu-like symptoms
  • A rash
  • A swollen eyelid

These early symptoms usually go away. However, if you don't treat the infection, it stays in your body. Later, it can cause serious intestinal and heart problems.

A physical exam and blood tests can diagnose it. You may also need tests to see whether the disease has affected your intestines and heart.

Medicines can kill the parasite, especially early on. You can also treat related problems. For example, a pacemaker helps with certain heart complications.

There are no vaccines or medicines to prevent Chagas disease. If you travel to areas where it occurs, you are at higher risk if you sleep outdoors or in poor housing conditions. It is important to use insecticides to prevent bites, and practice food safety.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Chagas disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Chagas Disease (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

[Learn More]

Encephalitis

Encephalitis is an inflammation of the brain. Usually the cause is a viral infection, but bacteria can also cause it. It can be mild or severe. Most cases are mild. You may have flu-like symptoms. With a mild case, you may just need rest, plenty of fluids, and a pain reliever.

Severe cases need immediate treatment. Symptoms of severe cases include

  • Severe headache
  • Sudden fever
  • Drowsiness
  • Vomiting
  • Confusion
  • Seizures

In babies, additional symptoms may include constant crying, poor feeding, body stiffness, and bulging in the soft spots of the skull.

Severe cases may require a stay in the hospital. Treatments include oral and intravenous (IV) medicines to reduce inflammation and treat infection. Patients with breathing difficulties may need artificial respiration. Some people may need physical, speech, and occupational therapy once the illness is under control.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • CSF analysis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Encephalitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Meningitis

Also called: Spinal meningitis

Meningitis is inflammation of the thin tissue that surrounds the brain and spinal cord, called the meninges. There are several types of meningitis. The most common is viral meningitis. You get it when a virus enters the body through the nose or mouth and travels to the brain. Bacterial meningitis is rare, but can be deadly. It usually starts with bacteria that cause a cold-like infection. It can cause stroke, hearing loss, and brain damage. It can also harm other organs. Pneumococcal infections and meningococcal infections are the most common causes of bacterial meningitis.

Anyone can get meningitis, but it is more common in people with weak immune systems. Meningitis can get serious very quickly. You should get medical care right away if you have

  • A sudden high fever
  • A severe headache
  • A stiff neck
  • Nausea or vomiting

Early treatment can help prevent serious problems, including death. Tests to diagnose meningitis include blood tests, imaging tests, and a spinal tap to test cerebrospinal fluid. Antibiotics can treat bacterial meningitis. Antiviral medicines may help some types of viral meningitis. Other medicines can help treat symptoms.

There are vaccines to prevent some of the bacterial infections that cause meningitis.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cerebrospinal fluid culture (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meningitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meningitis - cryptococcal (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meningitis - gram-negative (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meningitis - H. influenzae (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meningococcal ACWY Vaccines - MenACWY and MPSV4: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13): What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine: What You Need to Know (Immunization Action Coalition)
  • Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

[Learn More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.