ICD-10-CM Code X38

Flood

Version 2020 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

X38 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of flood. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:X38
Short Description:Flood
Long Description:Flood

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code X38:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Flood arising from remote storm
  • Flood of cataclysmic nature arising from melting snow
  • Flood resulting directly from storm

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • collapse of dam or man-made structure causing earth movement X36.0
  • tidal wave NOS X37.41
  • tidal wave caused by storm X37.42

7th Character Note

7th Character Note
Certain ICD-10-CM categories have applicable 7th characters. The applicable 7th character is required for all codes within the category, or as the notes in the Tabular List instruct. The 7th character must always be the 7th character in the data field. If a code that requires a 7th character is not 6 characters, a placeholder X must be used to fill in the empty characters.
  • The appropriate 7th character is to be added to code X38

7th Character

7th Character
Indicates that a seventh character is to be assigned to codes in a subcategory.
  • A - initial encounter
  • D - subsequent encounter
  • S - sequela

Index of External Cause of Injuries

References found for the code X38 in the External Cause of Injuries Index:

    • Flood(any injury) (caused by)
    • Forces of nature
      • cataclysmic storm
        • with flood
    • Forces of nature
      • flood (caused by)

Clinical Information

  • IMPLOSIVE THERAPY-. a method for extinguishing anxiety by a saturation exposure to the feared stimulus situation or its substitute.
  • FLOODS-. sudden onset water phenomena with different speed of occurrence. these include flash floods seasonal river floods and coastal floods associated with cyclonic storms; tidalwaves; and storm surges.

Code Classification

  • External causes of morbidity and mortality (V01–Y98)
    • Exposure to forces of nature (X30-X39)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Floods

Floods are common in the United States. Weather such as heavy rain, thunderstorms, hurricanes, or tsunamis can cause flooding. Flooding can also happen when a river or stream overflows its bank, when a levee is breached, or when a dam breaks. Flash floods, which can develop quickly, often have a dangerous wall of roaring water. The wall carries rocks, mud, and rubble and can sweep away most things in its path.

Be aware of flood hazards no matter where you live, but especially if you live in a low-lying area, near water or downstream from a dam. Although there are no guarantees of safety during a flood, you can take actions to protect yourself. You should have a disaster plan. Being prepared can help reduce fear, anxiety, and losses. If you do experience a disaster, it is normal to feel stressed. You may need help in finding ways to cope.

Federal Emergency Management Agency


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