ICD-10 Code N23

Unspecified renal colic

Version 2019 Billable Code
ICD-10:N23
Short Description:Unspecified renal colic
Long Description:Unspecified renal colic

Valid for Submission

ICD-10 N23 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of unspecified renal colic. The code is valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the genitourinary system (N00–N99)
    • Urolithiasis (N20-N23)
      • Unspecified renal colic (N23)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups

The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC). The diagnosis code N23 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V36.0 applicable from 10/01/2018 through 09/30/2019.

  • 691 - URINARY STONES WITH ESW LITHOTRIPSY WITH CC/MCC
  • 692 - URINARY STONES WITH ESW LITHOTRIPSY WITHOUT CC/MCC
  • 693 - URINARY STONES WITHOUT ESW LITHOTRIPSY WITH MCC
  • 694 - URINARY STONES WITHOUT ESW LITHOTRIPSY WITHOUT MCC

Convert N23 to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms:

  • C/O - renal pain
  • C/O - ureteric colic
  • C/O - ureteric pain
  • Finding of sensation of kidney
  • Finding of sensation of kidney
  • Finding of sensation of kidney
  • Kidney tender
  • O/E - renal angle tenderness
  • Renal angle pain
  • Renal angle tenderness
  • Renal colic
  • Renal pain
  • Ureteric colic
  • Ureteric pain
  • Urinary tract pain
  • Urinary tract pain

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code N23 are found in the index:


Information for Patients


Kidney Stones

Also called: Nephrolithiasis

A kidney stone is a solid piece of material that forms in the kidney from substances in the urine. It may be as small as a grain of sand or as large as a pearl. Most kidney stones pass out of the body without help from a doctor. But sometimes a stone will not go away. It may get stuck in the urinary tract, block the flow of urine and cause great pain.

The following may be signs of kidney stones that need a doctor's help:

  • Extreme pain in your back or side that will not go away
  • Blood in your urine
  • Fever and chills
  • Vomiting
  • Urine that smells bad or looks cloudy
  • A burning feeling when you urinate

Your doctor will diagnose a kidney stone with urine, blood, and imaging tests.

If you have a stone that won't pass on its own, you may need treatment. It can be done with shock waves; with a scope inserted through the tube that carries urine out of the body, called the urethra; or with surgery.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Kidney stones (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Kidney stones - lithotripsy - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Kidney stones - self-care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lithotripsy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ureteroscopy (Medical Encyclopedia)

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Pelvic Pain

Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. It can be a sharp and stabbing pain in a specific spot, or a dull pain that is spread out. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way of your daily activities.

If you're a woman, you might feel pain during your period. It could also happen when you have sex. Pelvic pain can be a sign that there is a problem with one of the organs in your pelvic area, such as the uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes, cervix, or vagina. If you're a man, the cause could be problem with the prostate. In men and women, it could be a symptom of infection, or a problem with the urinary tract, lower intestines, rectum, muscle, or bone. Some women have more than one cause of pelvic pain at the same time.

You might have to have lab, imaging, or other medical tests to find the cause of the pain. The treatment will depend on the cause, how bad the pain is, and how often it occurs.

NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development


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ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.