ICD-10-CM Code N20.0

Calculus of kidney

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

N20.0 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of calculus of kidney. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code N20.0 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like calcium oxalate urolithiasis, calcium renal calculus, calculus in calyceal diverticulum, calculus in renal pelvis, calyceal renal calculus, genitourinary tract problem, etc

ICD-10:N20.0
Short Description:Calculus of kidney
Long Description:Calculus of kidney

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code N20.0:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Nephrolithiasis NOS
  • Renal calculus
  • Renal stone
  • Staghorn calculus
  • Stone in kidney

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code N20.0 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Calcium oxalate urolithiasis
  • Calcium renal calculus
  • Calculus in calyceal diverticulum
  • Calculus in renal pelvis
  • Calyceal renal calculus
  • Genitourinary tract problem
  • Genitourinary tract problem
  • Kidney stone
  • Matrix stone of kidney
  • O/E - urinary tract
  • O/E: cystine renal calculus
  • O/E: oxalate renal calculus
  • O/E: phosphate -staghorn-stone
  • O/E: renal calculus
  • O/E: renal calculus
  • O/E: uric acid renal calculus
  • Oxalate stone O/E
  • Staghorn calculus
  • Uric acid renal calculus
  • Uric acid urolithiasis
  • Urolith
  • Urolith
  • X-linked recessive nephrolithiasis with renal failure

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code N20.0 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2019 through 09/30/2020.

  • 693 - URINARY STONES WITH MCC
  • 694 - URINARY STONES WITHOUT MCC

Convert N20.0 to ICD-9

  • 592.0 - Calculus of kidney (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the genitourinary system (N00–N99)
    • Urolithiasis (N20-N23)
      • Calculus of kidney and ureter (N20)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Kidney Stones

A kidney stone is a solid piece of material that forms in the kidney from substances in the urine. It may be as small as a grain of sand or as large as a pearl. Most kidney stones pass out of the body without help from a doctor. But sometimes a stone will not go away. It may get stuck in the urinary tract, block the flow of urine and cause great pain.

The following may be signs of kidney stones that need a doctor's help:

  • Extreme pain in your back or side that will not go away
  • Blood in your urine
  • Fever and chills
  • Vomiting
  • Urine that smells bad or looks cloudy
  • A burning feeling when you urinate

Your doctor will diagnose a kidney stone with urine, blood, and imaging tests.

If you have a stone that won't pass on its own, you may need treatment. It can be done with shock waves; with a scope inserted through the tube that carries urine out of the body, called the urethra; or with surgery.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


[Learn More]

Kidney stones Kidney stones (also called renal stones or urinary stones) are small, hard deposits that form in one or both kidneys; the stones are made up of minerals or other compounds found in urine. Kidney stones vary in size, shape, and color. To be cleared from the body (or "passed"), the stones need to travel through ducts that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder (ureters) and be excreted. Depending on their size, kidney stones generally take days to weeks to pass out of the body.Kidney stones can cause abdominal or back pain (known as renal colic). Renal colic usually begins sporadically but then becomes constant and can lead to nausea and vomiting. The site of pain can change as the stone moves through the urinary tract. Some small stones pass through the kidney and urinary tract with little discomfort, while larger ones can block the flow of urine and impair kidney function. Kidney stones can also result in blood in the urine (hematuria) or kidney or urinary tract infections. Unusually large stones or stones that are difficult to pass can be medically removed.Although there are many types of kidney stones, four main types are classified by the material they are made of. Up to 75 percent of all kidney stones are composed primarily of calcium. Stones can also be made up of uric acid (a normal waste product), cystine (a protein building block), or struvite (a phosphate mineral). Stones form when there is more of the compound in the urine than can be dissolved. This imbalance can occur when there is an increased amount of the material in the urine, a reduced amount of liquid urine, or a combination of both.People are most likely to develop kidney stones between ages 40 and 60, though the stones can appear at any age. Research shows that 35 to 50 percent of people who have one kidney stone will develop additional stones, usually within 10 years of the first stone.
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