ICD-10-CM Code N25.0

Renal osteodystrophy

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

N25.0 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code N25.0 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like impaired renal function disorder, mixed renal osteodystrophy, phosphate-losing tubular disorders, renal dwarfism, renal osteodystrophy, renal secondary osteodystrophia fibrosa, etc

ICD-10:N25.0
Short Description:Renal osteodystrophy
Long Description:Renal osteodystrophy

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code N25.0:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Azotemic osteodystrophy
  • Phosphate-losing tubular disorders
  • Renal rickets
  • Renal short stature

Type 2 Excludes

Type 2 Excludes
A type 2 excludes note represents "Not included here". An excludes2 note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition represented by the code, but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When an Excludes2 note appears under a code, it is acceptable to use both the code and the excluded code together, when appropriate.
  • metabolic disorders classifiable to E70 E88

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code N25.0 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Impaired renal function disorder
  • Mixed renal osteodystrophy
  • Phosphate-losing tubular disorders
  • Renal dwarfism
  • Renal osteodystrophy
  • Renal secondary osteodystrophia fibrosa

Clinical Information

  • CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE MINERAL AND BONE DISORDER-. decalcification of bone or abnormal bone development due to chronic kidney diseases in which 125 dihydroxyvitamin d3 synthesis by the kidneys is impaired leading to reduced negative feedback on parathyroid hormone. the resulting secondary hyperparathyroidism eventually leads to bone disorders.

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code N25.0 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V38.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2021.

  • 698 - OTHER KIDNEY AND URINARY TRACT DIAGNOSES WITH MCC
  • 699 - OTHER KIDNEY AND URINARY TRACT DIAGNOSES WITH CC
  • 700 - OTHER KIDNEY AND URINARY TRACT DIAGNOSES WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert N25.0 to ICD-9

  • 588.0 - Renal osteodystrophy

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the genitourinary system (N00–N99)
    • Other disorders of kidney and ureter (N25-N29)
      • Disorders resulting from impaired renal tubular function (N25)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Bone Diseases

Your bones help you move, give you shape and support your body. They are living tissues that rebuild constantly throughout your life. During childhood and your teens, your body adds new bone faster than it removes old bone. After about age 20, you can lose bone faster than you make bone. To have strong bones when you are young, and to prevent bone loss when you are older, you need to get enough calcium, vitamin D, and exercise. You should also avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol.

Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds of bone problems include

  • Low bone density and osteoporosis, which make your bones weak and more likely to break
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle
  • Paget's disease of bone makes them weak
  • Bones can also develop cancer and infections
  • Other bone diseases, which are caused by poor nutrition, genetics, or problems with the rate of bone growth or rebuilding

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

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Kidney Diseases

Also called: Renal disease

You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. They are near the middle of your back, just below the rib cage. Inside each kidney there are about a million tiny structures called nephrons. They filter your blood. They remove wastes and extra water, which become urine. The urine flows through tubes called ureters. It goes to your bladder, which stores the urine until you go to the bathroom.

Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove wastes. Causes can include genetic problems, injuries, or medicines. You have a higher risk of kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or a close family member with kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease damages the nephrons slowly over several years. Other kidney problems include

  • Cancer
  • Cysts
  • Stones
  • Infections

Your doctor can do blood and urine tests to check if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail, you will need dialysis or a kidney transplant.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

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