2021 ICD-10-CM Code N13.71

Vesicoureteral-reflux without reflux nephropathy

Version 2021
Billable Code
MS-DRG Mapping

Valid for Submission

N13.71 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of vesicoureteral-reflux without reflux nephropathy. The code N13.71 is valid during the fiscal year 2021 from October 01, 2020 through September 30, 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code N13.71 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like secondary left vesicoureteral reflux grade 1, secondary left vesicoureteral reflux grade 1 measured by radionuclide cystogram, secondary right vesicoureteral reflux grade 1, secondary right vesicoureteral reflux grade 1 measured by voiding urethrocystography, secondary right vesicoureteral reflux grade 3 , secondary right vesicoureteral reflux grade 3 measured by radionuclide cystogram, etc.

ICD-10:N13.71
Short Description:Vesicoureteral-reflux without reflux nephropathy
Long Description:Vesicoureteral-reflux without reflux nephropathy

Code Classification

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code N13.71 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Convert N13.71 to ICD-9 Code

The General Equivalency Mapping (GEM) crosswalk indicates an approximate mapping between the ICD-10 code N13.71 its ICD-9 equivalent. The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 code and the ICD-9 code and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Information for Patients


Ureteral Disorders

Your kidneys make urine by filtering wastes and extra water from your blood. The urine travels from the kidneys to the bladder in two thin tubes called ureters.

The ureters are about 8 to 10 inches long. Muscles in the ureter walls tighten and relax to force urine down and away from the kidneys. Small amounts of urine flow from the ureters into the bladder about every 10 to 15 seconds.

Sometimes the ureters can become blocked or injured. This can block the flow of urine to the bladder. If urine stands still or backs up the ureter, you may get a urinary tract infections.

Doctors diagnose problems with the ureters using different tests. These include urine tests, x-rays, and examination of the ureter with a scope called a cystoscope. Treatment depends on the cause of the problem. It may include medicines and, in severe cases, surgery.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)