M21.61 - Bunion

Version 2023
ICD-10:M21.61
Short Description:Bunion
Long Description:Bunion
Status: Not Valid for Submission
Version:ICD-10-CM 2023
Code Classification:
  • Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (M00–M99)
    • Other joint disorders (M20-M25)
      • Other acquired deformities of limbs (M21)

M21.61 is a non-specific and non-billable ICD-10 code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of bunion. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2023 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

Clinical Information

Specific Coding for Bunion

Non-specific codes like M21.61 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for bunion:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use M21.611 for Bunion of right foot
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use M21.612 for Bunion of left foot
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use M21.619 for Bunion of unspecified foot

Index to Diseases and Injuries References

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for this diagnosis code are found in the injuries and diseases index:

Patient Education


Bunion

A bunion, known technically as hallux valgus, is a bony bump on the side of the foot at the base of the big toe. Bunions develop slowly as pressure on the joint at the base of the big toe causes the toe to move out of place, leaning inward toward the second toe. Because this joint carries a lot of weight during activities like standing and walking, bunions can cause foot pain, stiffness, redness, and swelling. Calluses may form where the big toe and second toe rub together or on the ball of the foot. Unless they are treated, bunions get worse over time, and it may become difficult to wear regular shoes or walk without pain. Bunions can occur in one or both feet.

In most cases, bunions develop in adulthood. Rarely, children may be born with bunions (known as congenital hallux valgus) or develop them later in childhood (juvenile or adolescent hallux valgus).


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History