2022 ICD-10-CM Code L25

Unspecified contact dermatitis

Version 2021

Not Valid for Submission

ICD-10:L25
Short Description:Unspecified contact dermatitis
Long Description:Unspecified contact dermatitis

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L00–L99)
    • Dermatitis and eczema (L20-L30)
      • Unspecified contact dermatitis (L25)

L25 is a non-specific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of unspecified contact dermatitis. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

Unspecified diagnosis codes like L25 are acceptable when clinical information is unknown or not available about a particular condition. Although a more specific code is preferable, unspecified codes should be used when such codes most accurately reflect what is known about a patient's condition. Specific diagnosis codes should not be used if not supported by the patient's medical record.

Specific Coding for Unspecified contact dermatitis

Non-specific codes like L25 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for unspecified contact dermatitis:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use L25.0 for Unspecified contact dermatitis due to cosmetics
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use L25.1 for Unspecified contact dermatitis due to drugs in contact with skin
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use L25.2 for Unspecified contact dermatitis due to dyes
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use L25.3 for Unspecified contact dermatitis due to other chemical products
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use L25.4 for Unspecified contact dermatitis due to food in contact with skin
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use L25.5 for Unspecified contact dermatitis due to plants, except food
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use L25.8 for Unspecified contact dermatitis due to other agents
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use L25.9 for Unspecified contact dermatitis, unspecified cause

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with coding notes and guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code L25:


Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.

Type 2 Excludes

Type 2 Excludes
A type 2 excludes note represents "Not included here". An excludes2 note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition represented by the code, but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When an Excludes2 note appears under a code, it is acceptable to use both the code and the excluded code together, when appropriate.

Clinical Information

Information for Patients


Rashes

A rash is an area of irritated or swollen skin. Many rashes are itchy, red, painful, and irritated. Some rashes can also lead to blisters or patches of raw skin. Rashes are a symptom of many different medical problems. Other causes include irritating substances and allergies. Certain genes can make people more likely to get rashes.

Contact dermatitis is a common type of rash. It causes redness, itching, and sometimes small bumps. You get the rash where you have touched an irritant, such as a chemical, or something you are allergic to, like poison ivy.

Some rashes develop right away. Others form over several days. Although most rashes clear up fairly quickly, others are long-lasting and need long-term treatment.

Because rashes can be caused by many different things, it's important to figure out what kind you have before you treat it. If it is a bad rash, if it does not go away, or if you have other symptoms, you should see your health care provider. Treatments may include moisturizers, lotions, baths, cortisone creams that relieve swelling, and antihistamines, which relieve itching.


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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)