2022 ICD-10-CM Code F42

Obsessive-compulsive disorder

Version 2021

Not Valid for Submission

ICD-10:F42
Short Description:Obsessive-compulsive disorder
Long Description:Obsessive-compulsive disorder

Code Classification

  • Mental and behavioural disorders (F00–F99)
    • Anxiety, dissociative, stress-related, somatoform and other nonpsychotic mental disorders (F40-F48)
      • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (F42)

F42 is a non-specific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

Specific Coding for Obsessive-compulsive disorder

Non-specific codes like F42 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for obsessive-compulsive disorder:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F42.2 for Mixed obsessional thoughts and acts
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F42.3 for Hoarding disorder
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F42.4 for Excoriation (skin-picking) disorder
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F42.8 for Other obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F42.9 for Obsessive-compulsive disorder, unspecified

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with coding notes and guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code F42:


Type 2 Excludes

Type 2 Excludes
A type 2 excludes note represents "Not included here". An excludes2 note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition represented by the code, but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When an Excludes2 note appears under a code, it is acceptable to use both the code and the excluded code together, when appropriate.

Clinical Information

Information for Patients


Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

What is obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)?

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a mental disorder in which you have thoughts (obsessions) and rituals (compulsions) over and over. They interfere with your life, but you cannot control or stop them.

What causes obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)?

The cause of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is unknown. Factors such as genetics, brain biology and chemistry, and your environment may play a role.

Who is at risk for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)?

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) usually begins when you are a teen or young adult. Boys often develop OCD at a younger age than girls.

Risk factors for OCD include

In some cases, children may develop OCD or OCD symptoms following a streptococcal infection. This is called Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS).

What are the symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)?

People with OCD may have symptoms of obsessions, compulsions, or both:

Some people with OCD also have a Tourette syndrome or another tic disorder. Tics are sudden twitches, movements, or sounds that people do repeatedly. People who have tics cannot stop their body from doing these things.

How is obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) diagnosed?

The first step is to talk with your health care provider about your symptoms. Your provider should do an exam and ask you about your medical history. He or she needs to make sure that a physical problem is not causing your symptoms. If it seems to be a mental problem, your provider may refer you to a mental health specialist for further evaluation or treatment.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) can sometimes be hard to diagnose. Its symptoms are like those of other mental disorders, such as anxiety disorders. It is also possible to have both OCD and another mental disorder.

Not everyone who has obsessions or compulsions has OCD. Your symptoms would usually be considered OCD when you

What are the treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)?

The main treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are cognitive behavioral therapy, medicines, or both:

NIH: National Institute of Mental Health


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Obsessive-compulsive disorder

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a mental health condition characterized by features called obsessions and compulsions. Obsessions are intrusive thoughts, mental images, or urges to perform specific actions. While the particular obsessions vary widely, they often include fear of illness or contamination; a desire for symmetry or getting things "just right;" or intrusive thoughts involving religion, sex, or aggression. Compulsions consist of the repetitive performance of certain actions, such as checking or verifying, washing, counting, arranging, acting out specific routines, or seeking assurance. These behaviors are performed to relieve anxiety, rather than to seek pleasure as in other compulsive behaviors like gambling, eating, or sex.

While almost everyone experiences obsessive feelings and compulsive behaviors occasionally or in particular contexts, in OCD they take up more than an hour a day and cause problems with work, school, or social life. People with OCD generally experience anxiety and other distress around their need to accommodate their obsessions or compulsions.

About half the time, OCD becomes evident in childhood or adolescence, and most other cases appear in early adulthood. It is unusual for OCD to start after age 40. It tends to appear earlier in males, but by adulthood it is slightly more common in females. Affected individuals can experience periods when their symptoms increase or decrease in severity, but the condition usually does not go away completely.

Some people with OCD have additional mental health disorders such as generalized anxiety, depression, phobias, panic disorders, or schizophrenia. OCD can also occur in people with other neurological conditions such as Tourette syndrome and similar disorders, traumatic brain injury, stroke, or dementia.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)