2022 ICD-10-CM Code F43.1

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Version 2021

Not Valid for Submission

ICD-10:F43.1
Short Description:Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
Long Description:Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Code Classification

  • Mental and behavioural disorders (F00–F99)
    • Anxiety, dissociative, stress-related, somatoform and other nonpsychotic mental disorders (F40-F48)
      • Reaction to severe stress, and adjustment disorders (F43)

F43.1 is a non-specific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (ptsd). The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

Specific Coding for Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Non-specific codes like F43.1 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for post-traumatic stress disorder (ptsd):

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F43.10 for Post-traumatic stress disorder, unspecified
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F43.11 for Post-traumatic stress disorder, acute
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use F43.12 for Post-traumatic stress disorder, chronic

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with coding notes and guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code F43.1:


Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.

Clinical Information

Information for Patients


Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

What is post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)?

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health disorder that some people develop after they experience or see a traumatic event. The traumatic event may be life-threatening, such as combat, a natural disaster, a car accident, or sexual assault. But sometimes the event is not necessarily a dangerous one. For example, the sudden, unexpected death of a loved one can also cause PTSD.

It's normal to feel afraid during and after a traumatic situation. The fear triggers a "fight-or-flight" response. This is your body's way of helping to protect itself from possible harm. It causes changes in your body such as the release of certain hormones and increases in alertness, blood pressure, heart rate, and breathing.

In time, most people recover from this naturally. But people with PTSD don't feel better. They feel stressed and frightened long after the trauma is over. In some cases, the PTSD symptoms may start later on. They might also come and go over time.

What causes post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)?

Researchers don't know why some people get PTSD and others don't. Genetics, neurobiology, risk factors, and personal factors may affect whether you get PTSD after a traumatic event.

Who is at risk for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)?

You can develop PTSD at any age. Many risk factors play a part in whether you will develop PTSD. They include

What are the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)?

There are four types of PTSD symptoms, but they may not be the same for everyone. Each person experiences symptoms in their own way. The types are

The symptoms usually start soon after the traumatic event. But sometimes they may not appear until months or years later. They also may come and go over many years.

If your symptoms last longer than four weeks, cause you great distress, or interfere with your work or home life, you might have PTSD.

How is post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosed?

A health care provider who has experience helping people with mental illnesses can diagnose PTSD. The provider will do a mental health screening and may also do a physical exam. To get a diagnosis of PTSD, you must have all of these symptoms for at least one month:

What are the treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)?

The main treatments for PTSD are talk therapy, medicines, or both. PTSD affects people differently, so a treatment that works for one person may not work for another. If you have PTSD, you need to work with a mental health professional to find the best treatment for your symptoms.

Can post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) be prevented?

There are certain factors that can help reduce the risk of developing PTSD. These are known as resilience factors, and they include

Researchers are studying the importance of the resilience and risk factors for PTSD. They are also studying how genetics and neurobiology can affect the risk of PTSD. With more research, someday it may be possible to predict who is likely to develop PTSD. This could also help in finding ways to prevent it.

NIH: National Institute of Mental Health


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)