ICD-10 Diagnosis Code C56.9

Malignant neoplasm of unspecified ovary

Diagnosis Code C56.9

ICD-10: C56.9
Short Description: Malignant neoplasm of unspecified ovary
Long Description: Malignant neoplasm of unspecified ovary
This is the 2019 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code C56.9

Valid for Submission
The code C56.9 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Malignant neoplasms of female genital organs (C51-C58)
      • Malignant neoplasm of ovary (C56)


Version 2019 Billable Code Diagnoses For Females Only

Information for Medical Professionals


Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Diagnoses for females only - Diagnoses for females only.

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code C56.9 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V35.0)

  • 736 - UTERINE AND ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR OVARIAN OR ADNEXAL MALIGNANCY WITH MCC
  • 737 - UTERINE AND ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR OVARIAN OR ADNEXAL MALIGNANCY WITH CC
  • 738 - UTERINE AND ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR OVARIAN OR ADNEXAL MALIGNANCY WITHOUT CC/MCC
  • 739 - UTERINE, ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR NON-OVARIAN AND NON-ADNEXAL MALIGNANCY WITH MCC
  • 740 - UTERINE, ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR NON-OVARIAN AND NON-ADNEXAL MALIGNANCY WITH CC
  • 741 - UTERINE, ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR NON-OVARIAN AND NON-ADNEXAL MALIGNANCY WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert to ICD-9
  • 183.0 - Malign neopl ovary (Approximate Flag)

Synonyms
  • Anemia in neoplastic disease
  • Anemia in ovarian carcinoma
  • Any T/any N and M1
  • Carcinoma of ovary, stage 1
  • Carcinoma of ovary, stage 2
  • Carcinoma of ovary, stage 3
  • Carcinoma of ovary, stage 4
  • Carcinosarcoma of ovary
  • Carcinosarcoma of uterine adnexa
  • Choriocarcinoma
  • Choriocarcinoma of ovary
  • Clear cell neoplasm of ovary
  • Cystadenocarcinoma of ovary
  • Dysgerminoma of ovary
  • Embryonal carcinoma of ovary
  • Endodermal sinus tumor of ovary
  • Endometrioid carcinoma ovary
  • Epithelial ovarian tumor, FIGO stage I
  • Epithelial ovarian tumor, FIGO stage IA
  • Epithelial ovarian tumor, FIGO stage IB
  • Epithelial ovarian tumor, FIGO stage IC
  • Epithelial ovarian tumor, FIGO stage II
  • Epithelial ovarian tumor, FIGO stage IIA
  • Epithelial ovarian tumor, FIGO stage IIB
  • Epithelial ovarian tumor, FIGO stage IIC
  • Epithelial ovarian tumor, FIGO stage III
  • Epithelial ovarian tumor, FIGO stage IIIA
  • Epithelial ovarian tumor, FIGO stage IIIB
  • Epithelial ovarian tumor, FIGO stage IIIC
  • Epithelial ovarian tumor, FIGO stage IV
  • Epithelial ovarian tumor, FIGO stage IVA
  • Epithelial ovarian tumor, FIGO stage IVB
  • Familial cancer of breast
  • Germ cell tumor of ovary
  • Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome
  • Immature teratoma of ovary
  • Invasive ovarian tumor omental implants absent
  • Invasive ovarian tumor omental implants present
  • Malignant epithelial tumor of ovary
  • Malignant germ cell tumor of ovary
  • Malignant granulosa cell tumor of ovary
  • Malignant sex cord tumor of ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving an organ by direct extension from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving an organ by separate metastasis from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving bladder by direct extension from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving bladder by separate metastasis from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving left broad ligament by direct extension from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving left fallopian tube by direct extension from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving left fallopian tube by separate metastasis from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving rectum by direct extension from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving rectum by separate metastasis from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving right broad ligament by direct extension from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving right fallopian tube by direct extension from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving right fallopian tube by separate metastasis from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving right ovary by separate metastasis from left ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving uterine cervix by direct extension from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving uterine cervix by separate metastasis from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving uterine corpus by direct extension from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving uterine corpus by separate metastasis from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving vagina by direct extension from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving vagina by separate metastasis from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving vulva by direct extension from ovary
  • Malignant tumor involving vulva by separate metastasis from ovary
  • Malignant tumor of ovary
  • Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of ovary
  • Non-invasive ovarian tumor omental implants absent
  • Non-invasive ovarian tumor omental implants absent
  • Non-invasive ovarian tumor omental implants present
  • Non-invasive ovarian tumor omental implants present
  • Ovarian cancer, disseminated
  • pM1
  • pN1
  • Primary high grade serous adenocarcinoma of ovary
  • Primary low grade serous adenocarcinoma of ovary
  • Primary malignant clear cell tumor of ovary
  • Primary malignant neoplasm of ovary
  • Primary mucinous adenocarcinoma of ovary
  • Primary mucinous carcinoma of uterine adnexa
  • Primary non-gestational choriocarcinoma of ovary
  • pT1
  • pT1a
  • pT1c
  • pT1c category
  • pT2
  • pT2a
  • pT2b
  • pT2c
  • pT2c category
  • pT3 and/or N1
  • pT3a
  • pT3b
  • pT3c AND/OR N1
  • Sarcoma of ovary
  • Secondary malignant neoplasm of body of uterus
  • Secondary malignant neoplasm of cervix uteri
  • Secondary malignant neoplasm of left fallopian tube
  • Secondary malignant neoplasm of rectum
  • Secondary malignant neoplasm of right fallopian tube
  • Secondary malignant neoplasm of right ovary
  • Secondary malignant neoplasm of vagina
  • Secondary malignant neoplasm of vulva
  • Serous papillary cystadenocarcinoma ovary
  • Sex cord tumor of ovary
  • T1a : Tumor limited to one ovary, capsule intact, no tumor on ovarian surface
  • T1c : Tumor limited to one or both ovaries with any of the following: capsule ruptured, tumor on ovarian surface, malignant cells in ascites or peritoneal washings: OVARY: Resection
  • T2: Ovarian tumor involves one or both ovaries with pelvic extension
  • T2a
  • T2b : Fallopian tube/ovarian tumor with extension to other pelvic structures
  • T2c with malignant cells in ascites or peritoneal washings
  • T3 and/or N1 : Ovarian tumor involves one or both ovaries with microscopically confirmed peritoneal metastasis outside the pelvis and/or regional lymph node metastasis
  • T3a : Fallopian tube/ovarian tumor with microscopic peritoneal metastasis beyond pelvis
  • T3b : Fallopian tube/ovarian tumor with macroscopic peritoneal metastasis beyond pelvis < 2 cm in greatest dimension
  • T3c : Fallopian tube/ovarian tumor with peritoneal metastasis beyond pelvis > 2 cm in greatest dimension and/or regional lymph node metastasis
  • Theca steroid producing cell malignant neoplasm of ovary
  • Undifferentiated carcinoma of ovary
  • Widespread metastatic malignant neoplastic disease
  • Yolk sac tumor
  • Yolk sac tumor

Index to Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code C56.9 in the Index to Diseases and Injuries:

  • - Cancer - See Also: Neoplasm, by site, malignant;
    • - ovarian - See Also: Neoplasm ovary, malignant; - C56.9

Information for Patients


Ovarian Cancer

The ovaries are part of the female reproductive system. They produce a woman's eggs and female hormones. Each ovary is about the size and shape of an almond.

Cancer of the ovary is not common, but it causes more deaths than other female reproductive cancers. The sooner ovarian cancer is found and treated, the better your chance for recovery. But ovarian cancer is hard to detect early. Women with ovarian cancer may have no symptoms or just mild symptoms until the disease is in an advanced stage. Then it is hard to treat. Symptoms may include

  • A heavy feeling in the pelvis
  • Pain in the lower abdomen
  • Bleeding from the vagina
  • Weight gain or loss
  • Abnormal periods
  • Unexplained back pain that gets worse
  • Gas, nausea, vomiting, or loss of appetite

To diagnose ovarian cancer, doctors do one or more tests. They include a physical exam, a pelvic exam, lab tests, ultrasound, or a biopsy. Treatment is usually surgery followed by chemotherapy.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene testing (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • CA-125 blood test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ovarian Cancer (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Ovarian cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)

[Read More]

Ovarian cancer Ovarian cancer is a disease that affects women. In this form of cancer, certain cells in the ovary become abnormal and multiply uncontrollably to form a tumor. The ovaries are the female reproductive organs in which egg cells are produced. In about 90 percent of cases, ovarian cancer occurs after age 40, and most cases occur after age 60.The most common form of ovarian cancer begins in epithelial cells, which are the cells that line the surfaces and cavities of the body. These cancers can arise in the epithelial cells on the surface of the ovary. However, researchers suggest that many or even most ovarian cancers begin in epithelial cells on the fringes (fimbriae) at the end of one of the fallopian tubes, and the cancerous cells migrate to the ovary.Cancer can also begin in epithelial cells that form the lining of the abdomen (the peritoneum). This form of cancer, called primary peritoneal cancer, resembles epithelial ovarian cancer in its origin, symptoms, progression, and treatment. Primary peritoneal cancer often spreads to the ovaries. It can also occur even if the ovaries have been removed. Because cancers that begin in the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and peritoneum are so similar and spread easily from one of these structures to the others, they are often difficult to distinguish. These cancers are so closely related that they are generally considered collectively by experts.In about 10 percent of cases, ovarian cancer develops not in epithelial cells but in germ cells, which are precursors to egg cells, or in hormone-producing ovarian cells called granulosa cells.In its early stages, ovarian cancer usually does not cause noticeable symptoms. As the cancer progresses, signs and symptoms can include pain or a feeling of heaviness in the pelvis or lower abdomen, bloating, feeling full quickly when eating, back pain, vaginal bleeding between menstrual periods or after menopause, or changes in urinary or bowel habits. However, these changes can occur as part of many different conditions. Having one or more of these symptoms does not mean that a woman has ovarian cancer.In some cases, cancerous tumors can invade surrounding tissue and spread to other parts of the body. If ovarian cancer spreads, cancerous tumors most often appear in the abdominal cavity or on the surfaces of nearby organs such as the bladder or colon. Tumors that begin at one site and then spread to other areas of the body are called metastatic cancers.Some ovarian cancers cluster in families. These cancers are described as hereditary and are associated with inherited gene mutations. Hereditary ovarian cancers tend to develop earlier in life than non-inherited (sporadic) cases.Because it is often diagnosed at a late stage, ovarian cancer can be difficult to treat; it leads to the deaths of about 14,000 women annually in the United States, more than any other gynecological cancer. However, when it is diagnosed and treated early, the 5-year survival rate is high.
[Read More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Present on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

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