ICD-10-CM Code A22.1

Pulmonary anthrax

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

A22.1 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of pulmonary anthrax. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code A22.1 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like anthrax or anthrax pneumonia or inhalational anthrax.

ICD-10:A22.1
Short Description:Pulmonary anthrax
Long Description:Pulmonary anthrax

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code A22.1:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Inhalation anthrax
  • Ragpicker's disease
  • Woolsorter's disease

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code A22.1 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Anthrax
  • Anthrax pneumonia
  • Inhalational anthrax

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code A22.1 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2020.

  • 177 - RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS AND INFLAMMATIONS WITH MCC
  • 178 - RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS AND INFLAMMATIONS WITH CC
  • 179 - RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS AND INFLAMMATIONS WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert A22.1 to ICD-9

  • 022.1 - Pulmonary anthrax (Approximate Flag)
  • 022.1 - Pulmonary anthrax (Combination Flag)
  • 484.5 - Pneumonia in anthrax (Combination Flag)

Code Classification

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Certain zoonotic bacterial diseases (A20-A28)
      • Anthrax (A22)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Anthrax

Anthrax is a disease caused by Bacillus anthracis, a germ that lives in soil. Many people know about it from the 2001 bioterror attacks. In the attacks, someone purposely spread anthrax through the U.S. mail. This killed five people and made 22 sick.

Anthrax is rare. It affects animals such as cattle, sheep, and goats more often than people. People can get anthrax from contact with infected animals, wool, meat, or hides. It can cause three forms of disease in people. They are

  • Cutaneous, which affects the skin. People with cuts or open sores can get it if they touch the bacteria.
  • Inhalation, which affects the lungs. You can get this if you breathe in spores of the bacteria.
  • Gastrointestinal, which affects the digestive system. You can get it by eating infected meat.

Antibiotics often cure anthrax if it is diagnosed early. But many people don't know they have anthrax until it is too late to treat. A vaccine to prevent anthrax is available for people in the military and others at high risk.


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Lung Diseases

When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to work and grow. During a normal day, you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in the U.S. have lung disease. If all types of lung disease are lumped together, it is the number three killer in the United States.

The term lung disease refers to many disorders affecting the lungs, such as asthma, COPD, infections like influenza, pneumonia and tuberculosis, lung cancer, and many other breathing problems. Some lung diseases can lead to respiratory failure.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health


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